Immune Mechanisms in Fish

The Special Issue "Immune Mechanisms in Fish" is available at http://www.mdpi.com/journal/biology/special_issues/immune-fish.

Dear Colleagues,

Fish immunity studies are at a pivotal point. Genomes of zebrafish and fugu have been examined in detail, those of rainbow trout, cod and coelacanths have recently been released, allowing for comparative studies revealing key evolutionary differences, such as lobe-finned fishes more closely resembling tetrapods or the lack of major histocompatibility class II and associated accessory genes in cod. In addition, novel technologies such as RNAseq have permitted large scale views of gene regulation. Functional studies in fish have provided novel regulatory and effector mechanisms that, upon subsequent study, are also present in mammals, such as transferrin activation of macrophages and phagocytic B cells. With this basis, future functional studies will provide even deeper insights into both mechanisms of fish immunity and the evolution of immune systems. For this special issue, we will review the state of the art in key areas of fish immunity as a basis for future studies.

Prof. Dr. Brian Dixon
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Created by: Candy Wan
Created on: 22 January 2015

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The Special Issue "Immune Mechanisms in Fish" is available at http://www.mdpi.com/journal/biology/special_issues/immune-fish.

Dear Colleagues,

Fish immunity studies are at a pivotal point. Genomes of zebrafish and fugu have been examined in detail, those of rainbow trout, cod and coelacanths have recently been released, allowing for comparative studies revealing key evolutionary differences, such as lobe-finned fishes more closely resembling tetrapods or the lack of major histocompatibility class II and associated accessory genes in cod. In addition, novel technologies such as RNAseq have permitted large scale views of gene regulation. Functional studies in fish have provided novel regulatory and effector mechanisms that, upon subsequent study, are also present in mammals, such as transferrin activation of macrophages and phagocytic B cells. With this basis, future functional studies will provide even deeper insights into both mechanisms of fish immunity and the evolution of immune systems. For this special issue, we will review the state of the art in key areas of fish immunity as a basis for future studies.

Prof. Dr. Brian Dixon
Guest Editor

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