New development of Sensors

To enhance the journal, sensors could present something like the News &
Views of nature journals only in a different manner. In sociology
sensing means to go straight to the bottom of something in the sense
“to uncover the truth”. Hence, one could develop two branches:

(1) Very critical contributions asking about the real impact of former
findings, inventions or prevailing opinions some years later? For
example what impact have had very promising physical effects or
technological or achievements in our daily life?

(2) Very speculative contributions risking a view into the future, e.g.
something along the line /Is graphene the sensing top matter in 2050?/
Alternatively, the prediction of relatively new topics like memristors
for human life in future and so on.

These aspects, which are not related to a senor in the sense of a
hardware component could attract many other readers or authors and
would work in natural sciences as well as in humanities but will change
sensors original focus.

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Sensors: present and future

 
W. Rudolf Seitz  |  28 July 2016 17:19  |  2 replies  |  View topic in separate thread
Some thoughts re sensors now and in the future from the editor who handles chemical sensor papers:

NOW:

Physical sensors seem to in well developed. I suspect that most of the developments in this field will involve software to interpret the data from sensors.

Chemical sensors need much more work. Continuous environmental sensing can be much more widespread and cover more analytes. Sensor controlled feedback systems for drug delivery are an attractive idea to be realized. Many clinical measurements are still made in the lab rather than the doctor’s office. Those of us who work in this area will be in business for the foreseeable future.

FUTURE:

I believe that chemical sensor development is limited by the availability of selective receptors. I believe that progress will occur as selective receptors are developed and replace the biological receptors that are now required for most assays.

TO CONTROVERSIAL TO EVEN THINK ABOUT:

What exactly is a sensor?

Rudi Seitz, University of New Hampshire
 
Ling Yang  |  9 August 2016 09:03
Thank you for providing your thoughts for us.

Yes, I agree with you, physical sensors are developed, but chemical sensors need much more work. However, we notice that chemical sensors attract more attention for /Sensors/ than physical sensors. In the most cited list of /Sensors/, there are 8 papers of chemical sensors and biosensors in the top ten. So we try to publish more good papers in the two sections.
 
Timothy Crammer  |  6 November 2016 23:09
We must look to materials, specifically nano materials to find new solutions to many sensor applications. We are looking into nano biosensors for predictive and preventative medicine. Please share thoughts, ideas or contacts.

New develoment of sensors:

 
Frances Ligler  |  8 July 2016 19:01  |  3 replies  |  View topic in separate thread
I like these ideas. They could definitely spark increased interest in Sensors. And they would be fun to read.

(1) Very critical contributions asking about the real impact of former
findings, inventions or prevailing opinions some years later? For
example what impact have had very promising physical effects or
technological or achievements in our daily life?

(2) Very speculative contributions risking a view into the future, e.g.
something along the line /Is graphene the sensing top matter in 2050?/
Alternatively, the prediction of relatively new topics like memristors
for human life in future and so on.
 
Stefano Mariani  |  14 July 2016 14:36
I do really like these ideas too.
Besides the technical issues, it would be nice to read an official reply by MDPI.

How, in case, can this be handled in terms of publication policy? For instance, are you maybe going to adopt a very strict review process (much stricter than for regular submissions), and then publish contributions for free?
What would be the way to maximize the visibility of such contributions (in the website and social networks)?
 
Ling Yang  |  29 July 2016 05:44
Thank you for providing your suggestions for us. We will think over it.

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Created by: Ling Yang
Created on: 05 July 2016

Full group description

To enhance the journal, sensors could present something like the News &
Views of nature journals only in a different manner. In sociology
sensing means to go straight to the bottom of something in the sense
“to uncover the truth”. Hence, one could develop two branches:

(1) Very critical contributions asking about the real impact of former
findings, inventions or prevailing opinions some years later? For
example what impact have had very promising physical effects or
technological or achievements in our daily life?

(2) Very speculative contributions risking a view into the future, e.g.
something along the line /Is graphene the sensing top matter in 2050?/
Alternatively, the prediction of relatively new topics like memristors
for human life in future and so on.

These aspects, which are not related to a senor in the sense of a
hardware component could attract many other readers or authors and
would work in natural sciences as well as in humanities but will change
sensors original focus.

Group members