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Chunting Michelle Wang   Ms.  Graduate Student or Post Graduate 
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Chunting Michelle Wang published an article in January 2017.
Top co-authors See all
Jessica Thomas

134 shared publications

John Parkington

118 shared publications

Roman Fischer

71 shared publications

Advanced Proteomics Facility, Target Discovery Institute, Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom

Beatrice Demarchi

58 shared publications

BioArCh, Department of Archaeology, University of York, York, United Kingdom

Terry Harrison

57 shared publications

38
Publications
18
Reads
2
Downloads
2
Citations
Publication Record
Distribution of Articles published per year 
(2015 - 2017)
Total number of journals
published in
 
3
 
Publications See all
Article 1 Read 2 Citations Unexpectedly high concentrations of monoterpenes in a study of UK homes Chunting Michelle Wang, Benjamin Barratt, Nicola Carslaw, Ar... Published: 01 January 2017
Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts, doi: 10.1039/C6EM00569A
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PubMed View at PubMed
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This paper reports the current concentrations, speciation and variability of VOCs in UK homes driven by buildings and by behaviour. The abundance of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) found in homes depends on many factors such as emissions, ventilation and the oxidative environment and these are evolving over time, reflecting changes in chemical use, behaviour and building design/materials. The concentrations of VOCs in 25 UK homes of varying ages, design and occupancy were quantified using continuous indoor air sampling over five days. Air was collected through low flow (1 mL min −1 ) constant flow restrictors into evacuated 6 L internally silica-treated canisters until the canisters reached atmospheric pressure. This was followed by thermal desorption-gas chromatography and high mass accuracy time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TD-GC-TOF/MS). A fully quantitative analysis was performed on the eight most abundant hydrocarbon-based VOCs found. Despite differences in building characteristics and occupant numbers 94% of the homes had d -limonene or α-pinene as the most abundant VOCs. The variability seen across the 25 homes in concentrations of monoterpenes indoors was considerably greater than that of species such as isoprene, benzene, toluene and xylenes. The variance in VOCs indoors appeared to be strongly influenced by occupant activities such as cleaning with 5-day average concentrations of d -limonene ranging from 18 μg m −3 to over 1400 μg m −3 , a peak domestic value that is possibly the highest yet reported in the literature.
COMPONENT 2 Reads 0 Citations Abstract Beatrice Demarchi, Shaun Hall, Teresa Roncal-Herrero, Colin ... Published: 27 September 2016
eLife, doi: 10.7554/elife.17092.001
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Proteins persist longer in the fossil record than DNA, but the longevity, survival mechanisms and substrates remain contested. Here, we demonstrate the role of mineral binding in preserving the protein sequence in ostrich (Struthionidae) eggshell, including from the palaeontological sites of Laetoli (3.8 Ma) and Olduvai Gorge (1.3 Ma) in Tanzania. By tracking protein diagenesis back in time we find consistent patterns of preservation, demonstrating authenticity of the surviving sequences. Molecular dynamics simulations of struthiocalcin-1 and -2, the dominant proteins within the eggshell, reveal that distinct domains bind to the mineral surface. It is the domain with the strongest calculated binding energy to the calcite surface that is selectively preserved. Thermal age calculations demonstrate that the Laetoli and Olduvai peptides are 50 times older than any previously authenticated sequence (equivalent to ~16 Ma at a constant 10°C).
COMPONENT 1 Read 0 Citations eLife digest Beatrice Demarchi, Shaun Hall, Teresa Roncal-Herrero, Colin ... Published: 27 September 2016
eLife, doi: 10.7554/elife.17092.002
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Proteins persist longer in the fossil record than DNA, but the longevity, survival mechanisms and substrates remain contested. Here, we demonstrate the role of mineral binding in preserving the protein sequence in ostrich (Struthionidae) eggshell, including from the palaeontological sites of Laetoli (3.8 Ma) and Olduvai Gorge (1.3 Ma) in Tanzania. By tracking protein diagenesis back in time we find consistent patterns of preservation, demonstrating authenticity of the surviving sequences. Molecular dynamics simulations of struthiocalcin-1 and -2, the dominant proteins within the eggshell, reveal that distinct domains bind to the mineral surface. It is the domain with the strongest calculated binding energy to the calcite surface that is selectively preserved. Thermal age calculations demonstrate that the Laetoli and Olduvai peptides are 50 times older than any previously authenticated sequence (equivalent to ~16 Ma at a constant 10°C).
COMPONENT 1 Read 0 Citations Figure 1. Eggshell peptide sequences from Africa have thermal ages two orders of magnitude older than those reported for... Beatrice Demarchi, Shaun Hall, Teresa Roncal-Herrero, Colin ... Published: 27 September 2016
eLife, doi: 10.7554/elife.17092.003
DOI See at publisher website
ABS Show/hide abstract
Proteins persist longer in the fossil record than DNA, but the longevity, survival mechanisms and substrates remain contested. Here, we demonstrate the role of mineral binding in preserving the protein sequence in ostrich (Struthionidae) eggshell, including from the palaeontological sites of Laetoli (3.8 Ma) and Olduvai Gorge (1.3 Ma) in Tanzania. By tracking protein diagenesis back in time we find consistent patterns of preservation, demonstrating authenticity of the surviving sequences. Molecular dynamics simulations of struthiocalcin-1 and -2, the dominant proteins within the eggshell, reveal that distinct domains bind to the mineral surface. It is the domain with the strongest calculated binding energy to the calcite surface that is selectively preserved. Thermal age calculations demonstrate that the Laetoli and Olduvai peptides are 50 times older than any previously authenticated sequence (equivalent to ~16 Ma at a constant 10°C).
COMPONENT 1 Read 0 Citations Figure 1—source data 1. Data and calculations for thermal ages reported in Figure 1 and in Supplementary file 1. Beatrice Demarchi, Shaun Hall, Teresa Roncal-Herrero, Colin ... Published: 27 September 2016
eLife, doi: 10.7554/elife.17092.004
DOI See at publisher website
COMPONENT 1 Read 0 Citations Figure 2. Proteome persistence and patterns of degradation. Beatrice Demarchi, Shaun Hall, Teresa Roncal-Herrero, Colin ... Published: 27 September 2016
eLife, doi: 10.7554/elife.17092.005
DOI See at publisher website
ABS Show/hide abstract
Proteins persist longer in the fossil record than DNA, but the longevity, survival mechanisms and substrates remain contested. Here, we demonstrate the role of mineral binding in preserving the protein sequence in ostrich (Struthionidae) eggshell, including from the palaeontological sites of Laetoli (3.8 Ma) and Olduvai Gorge (1.3 Ma) in Tanzania. By tracking protein diagenesis back in time we find consistent patterns of preservation, demonstrating authenticity of the surviving sequences. Molecular dynamics simulations of struthiocalcin-1 and -2, the dominant proteins within the eggshell, reveal that distinct domains bind to the mineral surface. It is the domain with the strongest calculated binding energy to the calcite surface that is selectively preserved. Thermal age calculations demonstrate that the Laetoli and Olduvai peptides are 50 times older than any previously authenticated sequence (equivalent to ~16 Ma at a constant 10°C).