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Sumi Hoshiko   Ms.  Institute, Department or Faculty Head 
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Sumi Hoshiko published an article in February 2019.
Top co-authors See all
Michelle Pearl

31 shared publications

Environmental Health Investigations Branch, California Department of Public Health (CDPH), Richmond, CA 94804, USA

Martin Kharrazi

19 shared publications

Environmental Health Investigations Branch, California Department of Public Health (CDPH), Richmond, CA 94804, USA

Dina Dobraca

8 shared publications

Environmental Health Investigations Branch, California Department of Public Health, Richmond, CA 94804, USA

April Roeseler

6 shared publications

California Tobacco Control Program, CDPH, Sacramento, CA 95814, USA

Rebecca Jackson

5 shared publications

Occupational Health Branch, California Department of Public Health, Richmond, CA 94804, USA

7
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36
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Publication Record
Distribution of Articles published per year 
(2009 - 2019)
Total number of journals
published in
 
5
 
Publications See all
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Differences in Prenatal Tobacco Exposure Patterns among 13 Race/Ethnic Groups in California Sumi Hoshiko, Michelle Pearl, Juan Yang, Kenneth M. Aldous, ... Published: 05 February 2019
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, doi: 10.3390/ijerph16030458
DOI See at publisher website ABS Show/hide abstract
Prenatal tobacco exposure is a significant, preventable cause of childhood morbidity, yet little is known about exposure risks for many race/ethnic subpopulations. We studied active smoking and environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure in a population-based cohort of 13 racially/ethnically diverse pregnant women: white, African American, Hispanic, Native American, including nine Asian/Pacific Islander subgroups: Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Filipino, Cambodian, Vietnamese, Laotian, Samoan, and Asian Indians (N = 3329). Using the major nicotine metabolite, cotinine, as an objective biomarker, we analyzed mid-pregnancy serum from prenatal screening banked in 1999–2002 from Southern California in an effort to understand differences in tobacco exposure patterns by race/ethnicity, as well as provide a baseline for future work to assess secular changes and longer-term health outcomes. Prevalence of active smoking (based on age- and race-specific cotinine cutpoints) was highest among African American, Samoan, Native Americans and whites (6.8–14.1%); and lowest among Filipinos, Chinese, Vietnamese and Asian Indians (0.3–1.0%). ETS exposure among non-smokers was highest among African Americans and Samoans, followed by Cambodians, Native Americans, Vietnamese and Koreans, and lowest among Filipinos, Japanese, whites, and Chinese. At least 75% of women had detectable cotinine. While for most groups, levels of active smoking corresponded with levels of ETS, divergent patterns were also found. For example, smoking prevalence among white women was among the highest, but the group’s ETS exposure was low among non-smokers; while Vietnamese women were unlikely to be active smokers, they experienced relatively high ETS exposure. Knowledge of race/ethnic differences may be useful in assessing disparities in health outcomes and creating successful tobacco interventions.
Article 0 Reads 1 Citation The San Diego 2007 wildfires and Medi-Cal emergency department presentations, inpatient hospitalizations, and outpatient... Justine A. Hutchinson, Jason Vargo, Meredith Milet, Nancy H.... Published: 10 July 2018
PLoS Medicine, doi: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1002601
DOI See at publisher website ABS Show/hide abstract
The frequency and intensity of wildfires is anticipated to increase as climate change creates longer, warmer, and drier seasons. Particulate matter (PM) from wildfire smoke has been linked to adverse respiratory and possibly cardiovascular outcomes. Children, older adults, and persons with underlying respiratory and cardiovascular conditions are thought to be particularly vulnerable. This study examines the healthcare utilization of Medi-Cal recipients during the fall 2007 San Diego wildfires, which exposed millions of persons to wildfire smoke. Respiratory and cardiovascular International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-9 codes were identified from Medi-Cal fee-for-service claims for emergency department presentations, inpatient hospitalizations, and outpatient visits. For a respiratory index and a cardiovascular index of key diagnoses and individual diagnoses, we calculated rate ratios (RRs) for the study population and different age groups for 3 consecutive 5-day exposure periods (P1 [October 22–26], P2 [October 27–31], and P3 [November 1–5]) versus pre-fire comparison periods matched on day of week (5-day periods starting 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, and 9 weeks before each exposed period). We used a bidirectional symmetric case-crossover design to examine emergency department presentations with any respiratory diagnosis and asthma specifically, with exposure based on modeled wildfire-derived fine inhalable particles that are 2.5 micrometers and smaller (PM2.5). We used conditional logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (ORs), adjusting for temperature and relative humidity, to assess same-day and moving averages. We also evaluated the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)’s Air Quality Index (AQI) with this conditional logistic regression method. We identified 21,353 inpatient hospitalizations, 25,922 emergency department presentations, and 297,698 outpatient visits between August 16 and December 15, 2007. During P1, total emergency department presentations were no different than the reference periods (1,071 versus 1,062.2; RR 1.01; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.95–1.08), those for respiratory diagnoses increased by 34% (288 versus 215.3; RR 1.34; 95% CI 1.18–1.52), and those for asthma increased by 112% (58 versus 27.3; RR 2.12; 95% CI 1.57–2.86). Some visit types continued to be elevated in later time frames, e.g., a 72% increase in outpatient visits for acute bronchitis in P2. Among children aged 0–4, emergency department presentations for respiratory diagnoses increased by 70% in P1, and very young children (0–1) experienced a 243% increase for asthma diagnoses. Associated with a 10 μg/m3 increase in PM2.5 (72-hour moving average), we found 1.08 (95% CI 1.04–1.13) times greater odds of an emergency department presentation for asthma. The AQI level “unhealthy for sensitive groups” was associated with significantly elevated odds of an emergency department presentation for respiratory conditions the day...
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations The San Diego 2007 wildfires and Medi-Cal emergency department presentations, inpatient hospitalizations, and outpatient... Justine A Hutchinson, Jason Vargo, Meredith Milet, Nancy H F... Published: 10 July 2018
PLoS Medicine,
PubMed View at PubMed ABS Show/hide abstract
The frequency and intensity of wildfires is anticipated to increase as climate change creates longer, warmer, and drier seasons. Particulate matter (PM) from wildfire smoke has been linked to adverse respiratory and possibly cardiovascular outcomes. Children, older adults, and persons with underlying respiratory and cardiovascular conditions are thought to be particularly vulnerable. This study examines the healthcare utilization of Medi-Cal recipients during the fall 2007 San Diego wildfires, which exposed millions of persons to wildfire smoke. Respiratory and cardiovascular International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-9 codes were identified from Medi-Cal fee-for-service claims for emergency department presentations, inpatient hospitalizations, and outpatient visits. For a respiratory index and a cardiovascular index of key diagnoses and individual diagnoses, we calculated rate ratios (RRs) for the study population and different age groups for 3 consecutive 5-day exposure periods (P1 [October 22-26], P2 [October 27-31], and P3 [November 1-5]) versus pre-fire comparison periods matched on day of week (5-day periods starting 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, and 9 weeks before each exposed period). We used a bidirectional symmetric case-crossover design to examine emergency department presentations with any respiratory diagnosis and asthma specifically, with exposure based on modeled wildfire-derived fine inhalable particles that are 2.5 micrometers and smaller (PM2.5). We used conditional logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (ORs), adjusting for temperature and relative humidity, to assess same-day and moving averages. We also evaluated the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)'s Air Quality Index (AQI) with this conditional logistic regression method. We identified 21,353 inpatient hospitalizations, 25,922 emergency department presentations, and 297,698 outpatient visits between August 16 and December 15, 2007. During P1, total emergency department presentations were no different than the reference periods (1,071 versus 1,062.2; RR 1.01; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.95-1.08), those for respiratory diagnoses increased by 34% (288 versus 215.3; RR 1.34; 95% CI 1.18-1.52), and those for asthma increased by 112% (58 versus 27.3; RR 2.12; 95% CI 1.57-2.86). Some visit types continued to be elevated in later time frames, e.g., a 72% increase in outpatient visits for acute bronchitis in P2. Among children aged 0-4, emergency department presentations for respiratory diagnoses increased by 70% in P1, and very young children (0-1) experienced a 243% increase for asthma diagnoses. Associated with a 10 μg/m3 increase in PM2.5 (72-hour moving average), we found 1.08 (95% CI 1.04-1.13) times greater odds of an emergency department presentation for asthma. The AQI level "unhealthy for sensitive groups" was associated with significantly elevated odds of an emergency department presentation for respiratory conditions the day following exposure,...
Article 0 Reads 5 Citations Mortality during a Large-Scale Heat Wave by Place, Demographic Group, Internal and External Causes of Death, and Buildin... Lauren Joe, Sumi Hoshiko, Dina Dobraca, Rebecca Jackson, Sve... Published: 09 March 2016
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, doi: 10.3390/ijerph13030299
DOI See at publisher website PubMed View at PubMed ABS Show/hide abstract
Mortality increases during periods of elevated heat. Identification of vulnerable subgroups by demographics, causes of death, and geographic regions, including deaths occurring at home, is needed to inform public health prevention efforts. We calculated mortality relative risks (RRs) and excess deaths associated with a large-scale California heat wave in 2006, comparing deaths during the heat wave with reference days. For total (all-place) and at-home mortality, we examined risks by demographic factors, internal and external causes of death, and building climate zones. During the heat wave, 582 excess deaths occurred, a 5% increase over expected (RR = 1.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03–1.08). Sixty-six percent of excess deaths were at home (RR = 1.12, CI 1.07–1.16). Total mortality risk was higher among those aged 35–44 years than ≥65, and among Hispanics than whites. Deaths from external causes increased more sharply (RR = 1.18, CI 1.10–1.27) than from internal causes (RR = 1.04, CI 1.02–1.07). Geographically, risk varied by building climate zone; the highest risks of at-home death occurred in the northernmost coastal zone (RR = 1.58, CI 1.01–2.48) and the southernmost zone of California’s Central Valley (RR = 1.43, CI 1.21–1.68). Heat wave mortality risk varied across subpopulations, and some patterns of vulnerability differed from those previously identified. Public health efforts should also address at-home mortality, non-elderly adults, external causes, and at-risk geographic regions.
Article 0 Reads 6 Citations Trends in CT scan rates in children and pregnant women: teaching, private, public and nonprofit facilities Sumi Hoshiko, Daniel Smith, Cathyn Fan, Carrie R. Jones, San... Published: 14 February 2014
Pediatric Radiology, doi: 10.1007/s00247-014-2881-8
DOI See at publisher website PubMed View at PubMed
Article 0 Reads 8 Citations Are thyroid hormone concentrations at birth associated with subsequent autism diagnosis? Sumi Hoshiko, Gayle C. Windham, Karen Fessel, Judith K. Gret... Published: 31 August 2011
Autism Research, doi: 10.1002/aur.219
DOI See at publisher website PubMed View at PubMed
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