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Timeline of Liseane Padilha Thives

2018
Sep
01
Published new article




Article

Application of stormwater collected from porous asphalt pavements for non-potable uses in buildings

Published: 01 September 2018 by Elsevier BV in Journal of Environmental Management

doi: 10.1016/j.jenvman.2018.05.094

0 Reads | 2 Citations
2018
Feb
15
Published new article




Article

Filtering Capability of Porous Asphalt Pavements

Published: 15 February 2018 by MDPI in Water

doi: 10.3390/w10020206

The objective of this study is to assess the filtering capability of porous asphalt pavement models and the quality of rainwater filtered by such models. Three slabs of porous asphalt mixtures and two models composed of porous layers that resulted in porous pavement structures were produced. Data were collected in two phases: using rainwater directly from the sky and then using stormwater runoff collected from a street. Parameters such as pH, dissolved oxygen, ammonia, phosphorus, nitrite, aluminium, chromium, copper, zinc, and iron were measured. For both rainwater and stormwater runoff quality analyses, there was an increase in the concentration of the following parameters: phosphorus, iron, aluminium, zinc, nitrite, chromium, copper, and pH; there was no significant variation in the concentration of dissolved oxygen; and there was a decrease in ammonia in one of the models. However, the concentrations of only phosphorus and aluminium exceeded the limits established by the Brazilian National Environmental Council and National Water Agency for the use of non-potable water. The models were capable of filtering rainwater and stormwater runoff, and reducing the concentration of ammonia. It can be concluded that it is possible to collect stormwater runoff from porous asphalt surfaces and porous asphalt pavements. Porous asphalt pavements are able to filter out certain pollutants from stormwater runoff and rainwater, and were shown to be an alternative to supply rainwater for non-potable uses and to recharge the water table.

2 Reads | 1 Citations
2017
Nov
16
Published new article






<strong>Filtering capability of porous pavements</strong>

Published: 16 November 2017 by MDPI AG in Proceedings

doi: 10.3390/ecws-2-04943

<p>The objective of this study is to assess the filtering capability of porous pavement models and the quality of rainwater and stormwater filtered by such models. Three slabs of porous asphalt mixtures and two systems composed of porous layers that resulted in porous pavement structures were produced. Data were collected in two phases: using rainwater directly from the sky and then using stormwater collected from a street. The models with different layers were assembled in acrylic boxes and rainwater was stored into the boxes in each rainfall event. Parameters such as pH, dissolved oxygen, ammonia, phosphorus, nitrite, aluminium, chromium, copper, zinc and iron were measured. The infiltration capacity of the models varied from 83.4% to 83.7%. For both rainwater and stormwater quality analyses, there was an increase in the concentration of the following parameters: phosphorus, iron, aluminium, zinc, nitrite, chromium, cooper and pH; there was no significant variation in the concentration of dissolved oxygen; and there was a decrease in ammonia in one of the models. However, the concentrations of only phosphorus and aluminium exceeded the limits established by the Brazilian National Environmental Council and National Water Agency for the use of non-potable water. The models were capable of filtering rainwater and stormwater, and reducing the concentration of ammonia. It can be concluded that it is possible to collect stormwater from asphalt porous surfaces and porous pavements. Porous pavements are able to filter out certain pollutants from stormwater and rainwater, and showed to be an alternative to harvest rainwater for non-potable uses and to recharge the water table.</p>

14 Reads | 0 Citations
2017
May
01
Published new article




Article

Asphalt mixtures emission and energy consumption: A review

Published: 01 May 2017 by Elsevier BV in Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews

doi: 10.1016/j.rser.2017.01.087

The objective of this paper is to assess carbon dioxide emissions and energy consumption for the production of road pavements by means of a literature review. The construction of the main types of pavements requires energy and generates greenhouse gas emissions that impact the environment. Different types of asphalt mixtures such as cold mixtures, warm mixtures, asphalt rubber mixtures and mixtures with reclaimed asphalt pavement were assessed. The fuel used in the burners that heat and dry the aggregates is the main source of emissions. Also, the aggregates moisture content is an important parameter that influences the energy consumption. On the other hand, the energy consumption and emissions to produce Portland cement mixtures are related to the process of cement production. For both asphalt and Portland cement mixtures, the extraction, manufacturing and placement were also evaluated. Moreover, the energy consumption of the pavements structures was evaluated. Pavements composed of Portland cement concrete consume more energy than hot mix asphalt. But, warm mix asphalt technologies can save 20–70% of the energy consumption when compared to hot mix asphalt, mainly due to the temperature reduction in the warm mix processes. In addition, the emissions caused by different fuels used to produce pavement mixtures were compared. Asphalt mixtures and their alternative technologies consumed less energy and emitted fewer gases than Portland cement mixtures. Carbon dioxide emissions for hot mix asphalt and asphalt rubber mixtures can be 70% lower than emissions for Portland cement concrete. Some alternatives to reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in asphalt mixtures production are the decrease of aggregates moisture content, reduction of the asphalt mixtures production temperature and use of waste materials in pavement construction. Switching from hot mix to warm mix technologies would reduce the carbon footprint generated by the asphalt industry.

0 Reads | 5 Citations
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