Please login first
Sabina Lautensach   Dr.  Other 
Timeline See timeline
Sabina Lautensach published an article in October 2014.
3
Publications
15
Reads
0
Downloads
0
Citations
Publication Record
Distribution of Articles published per year 

Publications
CONFERENCE-ARTICLE 6 Reads 0 Citations Education for Sustainability: How can Educators Address the Failure of Government? Alexander Lautensach, Sabina Lautensach Published: 31 October 2014
The 4th World Sustainability Forum, doi: 10.3390/wsf-4-h001
DOI See at publisher website
ABS Show/hide abstract
In many respects education systems worldwide still contribute more to the obstacles than to solutions in humanity's quest to implement acceptable forms of sustainable living. The same appears to be the case with governments, especially at superregional and national levels. We summarise the evidence suggesting that many governments fall short of their own broadly stated commitments towards sustainability. Their achievements are evaluated in relation to the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and currently discussed notions about the forthcoming Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Also, widely advocated transition strategies, in the educational sector and elsewhere, have met with only partial success. Our findings confirm our previous critical assessment of the UN's Decade of Education for Sustainable Development and of the dominant interpretations of sustainable development per se. We describe the extent of the shortfall and offer some explanations for it. In the classroom, efforts to educate for sustainability are dominated by contingencies, norms and possibilities that differ fundamentally from governance in their dynamics and contingencies. It is therefore possible for teachers at all levels to take the initiative in ways that can compensate to some extent for the failures of governments. This possibility is documented by example cases and further expanded conceptually to describe a productive operating space for educators to help prepare learners for the inevitable challenges of the transition. We refer specifically to the goals of making communities more resilient, reducing their ecological overshoot, and maximising their human security. It is the level of community that offers the greatest potential for mitigating the failures of government as well as of education.
CONFERENCE-ARTICLE 4 Reads 0 Citations Assessing the Top Performers: Mindful Conservatism and ‘Sustainable Development’ Alexander Lautensach, Sabina Lautensach Published: 01 November 2013
Proceedings of The 3rd World Sustainability Forum, doi: 10.3390/wsf3-f004
DOI See at publisher website
ABS Show/hide abstract
In the light of the increasing constraints imposed on human affairs and ambitions by the limits of our ecological support systems, the concept of sustainable development has undergone substantial revisions. In fact, many programs and plans that were advocated under the banner of sustainable development hardly qualify as either sustainable or even as development in any rigorous sense (Lautensach & Lautensach 2013). This finding is supported by the observation that the bioproductive areas of many of the world’s least ‘developed’ countries still exceed their ecological footprints (Lautensach & Lautensach 2010). In other words, unlike almost all of the world’s richer countries, they still operate within the realm of sustainability. The widely shared humanistic concern for the well-being of future generations elevates sustainability to a prime goal among our national and global aspirations. Countries that operate sustainably need to ensure that they remain in that realm, and others should endeavour to reach it. In this paper we focus on the former of those propositions and suggest some general policy directions that would help ‘developing’ countries retain their relatively sustainable status while improving the well-being and human security of their citizens. Preventive health care, subsistence agriculture, fertility reduction, and restrictions on foreign investments are discussed as possible means. Policies that are to be avoided include development schemes that increase market dependence and the ratio of footprint over capacity. As prerequisites we suggest counter hegemonic solidarity, democratic consensus, and holistic education. Lautensach, A. & S. Lautensach. 2013. Why ‘Sustainable Development’ is Often Neither: A Constructive Critique. Challenges in Sustainability 1(1): 3-15. http://librelloph.com/challengesinsustainability/article/view/cis-1.1.3 Lautensach, S. & A. Lautensach. 2010. Prioritising the Variables Affecting Human Security in South-East Asia. Austrian Journal of South-East Asian Studies.Vol. 3 (2): 194-210. http://www.seas.at/wp-content/plugins/download-monitor/download.php?id=40
Article 5 Reads 0 Citations Why 'Sustainable Development' Is Often Neither: A Constructive Critique Alexander Lautensach, Sabina Wanda Lautensach Published: 10 May 2013
Challenges in Sustainability, doi: 10.12924/cis2013.01010003
DOI See at publisher website
Top