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Dennis Mikel   Mr.  Other 
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Dennis Mikel published an article in October 2016.
Top co-authors See all
Barbara Turpin

82 shared publications

John Jansen

46 shared publications

Rodney Weber

28 shared publications

Richard Scheffe

21 shared publications

Paul A. Solomon

10 shared publications

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Research and Development Las Vegas Nevada USA

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Publications
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Measurements and Analysis of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons near a Major Interstate Dennis Mikel, Viney Aneja Published: 16 October 2016
Atmosphere, doi: 10.3390/atmos7100131
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Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were measured near Interstate 40, just east of Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA. The goals of this project were to ascertain whether a sufficient quantity of PAHs could be collected using low flow (16.7 L/minute) over 8-h periods and if so, do investigate how the PAHs correlate to local sources, atmospheric pollutants and meteorology. The 8-h integrated samples were collected on 20 sampling days over a two month period during fall 2014. The samples were collected using low flow (BGI Incorporated PQ200) fine particulate samplers analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Temporal distributions of the PAHs (average mean 9.2 nanogram/cubic meter ±9.0 std) were compared to traffic count, and meteorological and pollutant data collected at the near roadway station. Using the meteorological data (i.e., wind speed and direction vector data), wind roses were created illustrating the local sources of the PAHs. In terms of correlation to atmospheric oxidants, (i.e., ozone, nitrogen dioxide and nitric oxide) wind rose analysis illustrated the morning hours which were predominantly southern winds, while the afternoon hours illustrated southerly and easterly winds, which suggests that the automobile traffic is the main source of PAHs. The nighttime hours wind rose shows winds from the northerly and easterly direction, which are predominantly from the RDU International Airport. Since the wind direction vectors illustrated that the afternoon hours (i.e., 12 p.m. to 8 p.m.) were from the interstate, comparisons were performed on the samples collected in this time period for both the traffic and pollutant data. The comparison of the traffic data showed a correlation with the number of vehicles (>60 feet i.e., heavy duty diesel engine vehicles). In addition, with the ozone, nitrogen dioxide and nitric oxide) there is a significant linear correlation between the sum of the measured PAHs with nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3) with the R2 values being 0.1, 0.04 and 0.07 respectively. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) statistical regression was performed on the pollutant data versus the measured sum of the PAHs. With the alpha set at 0.05, (α = 0.05) the p-values for O3, NO2 and NO were 0.00613, 0.000496 and 0.000264, respectively, which are significant. In addition, the PAH concentration found in this study compare favorably to other published studies (0.1 to 193.6 ng/m3) both nationally and internationally.
CONFERENCE-ARTICLE 2 Reads 0 Citations Measurements and Analysis of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons near a Major Interstate Dennis Mikel, Viney Aneja Published: 15 July 2016
The 1st International Electronic Conference on Atmospheric Sciences, doi: 10.3390/ecas2016-A006
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Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were measured near Interstate 40, just east of Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. One hundred seven 8-h integrated samples were collected on 20 sampling days over a 2 month period in Fall 2014. The 8-h samples were collected by low flow (16.7 L/min) fine particulate samplers. The samples were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Temporal distribution of the PAHs (0.1–21.6 ng/m3 ± 9.0 std) were compared to meteorological and pollutant data collected at the near roadway station. There is a weak but significant correlation between the sum of the measured PAHs with ozone, nitrogen dioxide and nitric oxide, with the R2 values being 0.0049, 0.0187 and 0.0788 respectively. However the p-values (α = 0.05) were 0.044, 0.002 and 0.044, which are significant. Wind rose analysis illustrated the morning hours which were predominantly southern winds, while the afternoon hours illustrated southerly and easterly winds, which suggests that the automobile traffic as the main source of PAHs. The nighttime hours wind rose shows winds from northerly and easterly direction, which are predominantly from the RDU International Airport. PAH concentration found in this study compare favorably to other research studies (0.1 to 193.6 ng/m3) both nationally and internationally.

Article 0 Reads 14 Citations Overview of the 1999 Atlanta Supersite Project Paul A. Solomon, William Chameides, Rodney Weber, Ann Middle... Published: 01 January 2003
Journal of Geophysical Research, doi: 10.1029/2001jd001458
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[1] This paper presents an overview of the 1999 Atlanta Supersite Project coordinated through the Southern Oxidants Study and Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT) and funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) along with other sponsors who provided in‐kind support primarily through existing studies. The Atlanta Supersite Project was located at the existing Southeastern Aerosol Research Characterization Study (SEARCH)/Aerosol Research Inhalation Epidemiology Study (ARIES) site on Jefferson Street in NW Atlanta, Georgia. The primary objective of the Atlanta Supersite Project was to evaluate and compare advanced measurement methods for particulate matter mass and its components. Methods included filter‐ and denuder‐based time‐integrated or discrete samplers, a variety of semicontinuous methods measuring mass, its major components (sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, organic carbon, elemental carbon, trace elements) and gas‐phase precursors, and for the first time ever, a comparison among particle mass spectrometers; four in total. These data were complemented by meteorological data as well as gas‐phase criteria pollutant measurements and other supplemental data such as particle physical properties, volatile organic compounds (VOC), oxygenated VOC, and NOy. The primary and supplemental data also were used to better understand the formation and accumulation of particulate matter in Atlanta and to better understand source‐receptor relationships. This paper overviews the study, summarizing objectives, the site and measurements, and the relative reference data used for comparisons, and it overviews the meteorological and chemical characteristics of pollution in Atlanta during the study, puts the study in context of Atlanta and the southeast United States, and finally summarizes the key findings from the over 30 publications published, submitted, or in preparation. This paper also provides as complete a list as is currently available of those publications. Others certainly will be emerging over time. The comprehensive database is available through the Atlanta Supersite Project Web site sponsored by GIT (http://www-wlc.eas.gatech.edu/supersite/).