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Terence Epule Epule   Dr.  Other 
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Terence Epule Epule published an article in November 2017.
Top co-authors
Changhui Peng

228 shared publications

James D. Ford

60 shared publications

University of Leeds

Shuaib Lwasa

30 shared publications

Makerere University

8
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Publication Record
Distribution of Articles published per year 
(2011 - 2017)
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Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Climate change stressors in the Sahel Terence Epule Epule, James D. Ford, Shuaib Lwasa Published: 23 November 2017
GeoJournal, doi: 10.1007/s10708-017-9831-6
DOI See at publisher website
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Climate change adaptation in the Sahel Terence Epule Epule, James D. Ford, Shuaib Lwasa, Laurent Le... Published: 01 September 2017
Environmental Science & Policy, doi: 10.1016/j.envsci.2017.05.018
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Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Projections of maize yield vulnerability to droughts and adaptation options in Uganda Terence Epule Epule, James D. Ford, Shuaib Lwasa Published: 01 June 2017
Land Use Policy, doi: 10.1016/j.landusepol.2017.04.013
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Article 0 Reads 1 Citation Vulnerability of Maize Yields to Droughts in Uganda Terence Epule Epule, James D. Ford, Shuaib Lwasa, Laurent Le... Published: 02 March 2017
Water, doi: 10.3390/w9030181
DOI See at publisher website
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Climate projections in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) forecast an increase in the intensity and frequency of droughts with implications for maize production. While studies have examined how maize might be affected at the continental level, there have been few national or sub-national studies of vulnerability. We develop a vulnerability index that combines sensitivity, exposure and adaptive capacity and that integrates agroecological, climatic and socio-economic variables to evaluate the national and spatial pattern of maize yield vulnerability to droughts in Uganda. The results show that maize yields in the north of Uganda are more vulnerable to droughts than in the south and nationally. Adaptive capacity is higher in the south of the country than in the north. Maize yields also record higher levels of sensitivity and exposure in the north of Uganda than in the south. Latitudinally, it is observed that maize yields in Uganda tend to record higher levels of vulnerability, exposure and sensitivity towards higher latitudes, while in contrast, the adaptive capacity of maize yields is higher towards the lower latitudes. In addition to lower precipitation levels in the north of the country, these observations can also be explained by poor soil quality in most of the north and socio-economic proxies, such as, higher poverty and lower literacy rates in the north of Uganda.
Article 0 Reads 1 Citation Small Scale Farmers’ Indigenous Agricultural Adaptation Options in the Face of Declining or Stagnant Crop Yields in the ... Terence Epule Epule, Christopher Robin Bryant Published: 24 May 2016
Agriculture, doi: 10.3390/agriculture6020022
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Research has proven that, at a national scale in Cameroon, arable crop production is either declining or stagnant. In the face of these trends, governments, local and international organizations, communities and peasant farmers have developed adaptation options to sustain arable production and reduce poverty. Given this general context, and based on population perceptions and four study sites in the Southwest region of Cameroon, this study aims at verifying current trends in arable production and farmers’ adaptation options based on their indigenous knowledge. These analyses are based on the administration of 200 questionnaires and two focus group discussions (FGDs). The data were analysed using SPSS version 20 in which frequencies, percentages and means were calculated. In addition, the chi-squared statistical test of goodness of fit was calculated and the stated hypothesis was validated accordingly. The FGDs were analysed through verbatim transcriptions and with the aid of the context analysis software, Wordstat 7. The results show that current yields (2010–2014) in all the study sites are declining due to deforestation, poor governance, inadequate access to farm inputs such as fertilizers, increased economic opportunities elsewhere and a breakdown of cultural practices, while 10 years (2000–2010) previously, they had been increasing. It has also been found that the main adaptation options/coping mechanisms reported by the respondents in order of highest frquencies are: expansion of farm size, help from relatives and dependents that live on the farm, supplemental occupations or livelihood diversification and usage of organic fertilizers. From the chi-squared test, the alternate hypothesis that, “there is some difference between population proportions for different adaptation options or coping mechanisms” is validated.
Article 0 Reads 2 Citations Maize Production Responsiveness to Land Use Change and Climate Trends in Cameroon Terence Epule Epule, Christopher Robin Bryant Published: 31 December 2014
Sustainability, doi: 10.3390/su7010384
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Most studies on the responsiveness of maize production to various variables have dwelled on the responsiveness of maize production to variations in precipitation or temperature. This study seeks to verify the response of maize production in Cameroon to both climate trends and land use change. Therefore, for the first time, our study presents findings on the relative influence of both climate and land use change on maize production in Cameroon. The data used in this analysis are essentially time series data spanning the period 1961–2006. The data on quantity of maize produced, area of maize harvested and number of maize seeds planted was taken from (http://faostat.fao.org). The mean maize growing season temperature and precipitation data were collected from the 0.5° × 0.5° gridded collaborative datasets of the UNEP and the School of Geography and Environment at Oxford University and from the global crop calendar dataset. The data were analyzed using the average rate of change, detrended simulations, the multiple linear regression technique, correlation coefficient and the coefficient of determination. The results show that maize production in Cameroon is more likely responsive to land use change (forest area change) than rainfall and temperature. However, for the climatic variables, maize production is more responsive to temperature variations than precipitation. In other words, the greater the land use change (forest area loss) the more likely the long run losses in the current maize production gains while rising temperatures were found to be more suitable for maize production. Even though the 1990s marked the period of recovering rainfall levels in most of the Sahel, large fluctuations were still recorded.