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Olivia Green   Mrs.  Post Doctoral Researcher 
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Olivia Green published an article in April 2015.
Top co-authors See all
William Shuster

69 shared publications

Research Hydrologist, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, United States Environmental Protection Agency, 26 West Martin Luther King Dr., Cincinnati, OH 45268 (corresponding author). ORCID:

Ahjond S. Garmestani

26 shared publications

National Risk Management Research Laboratory

Barbara Cosens

19 shared publications

Universities Consortium on Columbia River Governance (UCCRG), University of Idaho College of Law, Moscow, USA

Andrea Keessen

7 shared publications

Assistant Professor, Institute of Constitutional and Administrative Law, Utrecht University, The Netherlands ( )

Hale W. Thurston

7 shared publications

US Environmental Protection Agency

7
Publications
5
Reads
0
Downloads
35
Citations
Publication Record
Distribution of Articles published per year 
(2012 - 2015)
Total number of journals
published in
 
4
 
Publications See all
BOOK-CHAPTER 0 Reads 0 Citations The Role of Bridging Organizations in Enhancing Ecosystem Services and Facilitating Adaptive Management of Social-Ecolog... Olivia Odom Green, Lisen Schultz, Marmar Nekoro Published: 25 April 2015
Adaptive Management of Social-Ecological Systems, doi: 10.1007/978-94-017-9682-8_7
DOI See at publisher website
Article 0 Reads 6 Citations A Multi-Scalar Examination of Law for Sustainable Ecosystems Olivia Odom Green, Ahjond S. Garmestani, Matthew E. Hopton, ... Published: 30 May 2014
Sustainability, doi: 10.3390/su6063534
DOI See at publisher website ABS Show/hide abstract
The loss of resilience in social-ecological systems has the capacity to decrease essential ecosystem services, posing threats to human survival. To achieve sustainability, we must not only understand the ecological dynamics of a system, such as coral reefs, but must also promulgate regulations that promote beneficial behavior to address ecological stressors throughout the system. Furthermore, laws should reflect that systems operate at multiple spatial and temporal scales, thus requiring management across traditional legal jurisdictions. In this paper, we conducted a multi-scalar examination of law for sustainable ecosystems and how law pertains to coral reef ecosystems in particular. Findings indicate that, in order to achieve sustainability, we must develop new or reform existing legal mechanisms to protect ecosystems.
Article 0 Reads 8 Citations EU Water Governance: Striking the Right Balance between Regulatory Flexibility and Enforcement? Olivia O. Green, Ahjond S. Garmestani, Helena F. M. W. Van R... Published: 01 January 2013
Ecology and Society, doi: 10.5751/es-05357-180210
DOI See at publisher website
Article 4 Reads 5 Citations Resilience in Transboundary Water Governance: the Okavango River Basin Olivia O. Green, Barbara A. Cosens, Ahjond S. Garmestani Published: 01 January 2013
Ecology and Society, doi: 10.5751/es-05453-180223
DOI See at publisher website
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Correction: Identification and Induction of Human, Social, and Cultural Capitals through an Experimental Approach to Sto... Olivia Odom Green, William D. Shuster, Lee K. Rhea, Ahjond S... Published: 13 September 2012
Sustainability, doi: 10.3390/su4092209
DOI See at publisher website ABS Show/hide abstract
Note: In lieu of an abstract, this is an excerpt from the first page.Excerpt The authors wish to insert this additional sentence in the Acknowledgments section: “The views expressed in this paper are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views or policies of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.”
Article 0 Reads 14 Citations Identification and Induction of Human, Social, and Cultural Capitals through an Experimental Approach to Stormwater Mana... Olivia Odom Green, William D. Shuster, Lee K. Rhea, Ahjond S... Published: 06 August 2012
Sustainability, doi: 10.3390/su4081669
DOI See at publisher website ABS Show/hide abstract
Decentralized stormwater management is based on the dispersal of stormwater management practices (SWMP) throughout a watershed to manage stormwater runoff volume and potentially restore natural hydrologic processes. This approach to stormwater management is increasingly popular but faces constraints related to land access and citizen engagement. We tested a novel method of environmental management through citizen-based stormwater management on suburban private land. After a nominal induction of human capital through an education campaign, two successive (2007, 2008) reverse auctions engaged residents to voluntarily bid on installation of SWMPs on their property. Cumulatively, 81 rain gardens and 165 rain barrels were installed on approximately one-third of the 350 eligible residential properties in the watershed, resulting in an estimated 360 m3 increase in stormwater detention capacity. One surprising result was the abundance of zero dollar bids, indicating even a limited-effort human capital campaign was sufficient to enroll many participants. In addition, we used statistical methods to illustrate the significant role of social capital in forming clusters of adjacent properties that participated in bidding. This indicated that as participants shared their experiences, neighbors may have become more willing to trust the program and enroll. Significant agglomerations of participating properties may indicate a shift in neighborhood culture regarding stormwater management with positive implications for watershed health through the sustained induction of alternate capitals.
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