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Olivia Green   Mrs.  Post Doctoral Researcher 
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Olivia Green published an article in January 2015.
Top co-authors See all
Matthew T. Heberling

20 shared publications

Ahjond S. Garmestani

19 shared publications

Barbara A. Cosens

18 shared publications

Matthew Hopton

11 shared publications

Andrea M. Keessen

8 shared publications

5
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8
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Publication Record
Distribution of Articles published per year 
(1993 - 2015)
Total number of journals
published in
 
4
 
Publications
BOOK-CHAPTER 0 Reads 0 Citations The Role of Bridging Organizations in Enhancing Ecosystem Services and Facilitating Adaptive Management of Social-Ecolog... Olivia Odom Green, Lisen Schultz, Marmar Nekoro Published: 01 January 2015
Adaptive Management of Social-Ecological Systems, doi: 10.1007/978-94-017-9682-8_7
DOI See at publisher website
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The nested nature of social-ecological systems across scales requires a multi-scale approach for monitoring and response. However, in many cases this flow is hindered by hierarchical structures and bureaucratic procedures. Recent research suggests that bridging organizations that facilitate collaboration and learning across sectors and scales are key to adaptive governance. Bridging organizations can facilitate cross-scale linkages, enabling formal management entities operating at discrete scales to improve communication channels and create opportunities for collaboration. This allows for management to set new target levels and modify policy to reach those target levels as new information is generated on scale-specific system attributes. Bridging organizations also incubate new ideas for environmental management, provide a forum for coming to agreement on contentious issues, and foster the capacity to manage for resilience of social-ecological systems and the provisioning of ecosystem services that are directly and indirectly important on a regional and international scale.
Article 0 Reads 4 Citations A Multi-Scalar Examination of Law for Sustainable Ecosystems Olivia Green, Ahjond Garmestani, Matthew Hopton, Matthew Heb... Published: 30 May 2014
Sustainability, doi: 10.3390/su6063534
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The loss of resilience in social-ecological systems has the capacity to decrease essential ecosystem services, posing threats to human survival. To achieve sustainability, we must not only understand the ecological dynamics of a system, such as coral reefs, but must also promulgate regulations that promote beneficial behavior to address ecological stressors throughout the system. Furthermore, laws should reflect that systems operate at multiple spatial and temporal scales, thus requiring management across traditional legal jurisdictions. In this paper, we conducted a multi-scalar examination of law for sustainable ecosystems and how law pertains to coral reef ecosystems in particular. Findings indicate that, in order to achieve sustainability, we must develop new or reform existing legal mechanisms to protect ecosystems.
Article 0 Reads 2 Citations EU Water Governance: Striking the Right Balance between Regulatory Flexibility and Enforcement? Olivia O. Green, Ahjond S. Garmestani, Helena F. M. W. van R... Published: 01 January 2013
Ecology and Society, doi: 10.5751/es-05357-180210
DOI See at publisher website
Article 0 Reads 1 Citation Resilience in Transboundary Water Governance: the Okavango River Basin Olivia O. Green, Barbara A. Cosens, Ahjond S. Garmestani Published: 01 January 2013
Ecology and Society, doi: 10.5751/es-05453-180223
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Article 0 Reads 0 Citations EFFECT OF LIGHT AND WATER-STRESS ON PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND BIOMASS PRODUCTION IN BOLTONIA DECURRENS (ASTERACEAE), A THREATEN... Marian Smith, Yajun Wu, Olivia Green Published: 01 August 1993
American Journal of Botany, doi: 10.1002/j.1537-2197.1993.tb15305.x
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Boltonia decurrens (Torrey & Gray) Wood, a perennial species endemic to the Illinois River Valley, is threatened with extinction. Construction of a system of dikes along the Illinois River has altered flood patterns during the last 100 years, converting wet prairies and natural marshes to cropland. Remaining shore habitats have been modified by heavy siltation and altered flooding regimes. Boltonia decurrens is now confined to areas that are disturbed by occasional cropping, disappearing from sites after 3 to 5 years of natural succession. This study was conducted to determine the role of light and water availability upon growth and reproduction. Our data indicate that under greenhouse conditions B. decurrens requires high levels of light for optimal photosynthesis and growth, and is more sensitive to reductions in growth light level than to moderate drought-stress. This sensitivity to light regime may help explain its disappearance from disturbed areas after several years of natural succession. If B. decurrens is overtopped by fast-growing species, it could be shaded to the extent that growth and seed production would be severely affected, increasing the likelihood of its extinction.