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MAURICIO ROBERTO VERONEZ   Dr.  Institute, Department or Faculty Head 
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MAURICIO ROBERTO VERONEZ published an article in March 2017.
Top co-authors See all
Marco Scaioni

44 shared publications

Department of Architecture, Built Environment and Construction Engineering (DABC), Politecnico di Milano, 20133 Milano, Italy

Sílvio César Cazella

34 shared publications

UFCSPA, Brasil

Jorge Ricardo Ducati

23 shared publications

Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil

Ivandro Klein

11 shared publications

Land Surveying Program, Federal Institute of Santa Catarina (IFSC), Florianópolis, Brazil

Marcelo Eduardo Alves

10 shared publications

Dep. de Ciências Exatas, Escola Superior de Agricultura ‘Luiz de Queiroz’, ESALQ/USP, Piracicaba, SP, 13418-900, Brasil

23
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Publication Record
Distribution of Articles published per year 
(2008 - 2017)
Total number of journals
published in
 
19
 
Publications See all
Article 0 Reads 2 Citations An Alternative Method of Spatial Autocorrelation for Chlorophyll Detection in Water Bodies Using Remote Sensing Tainá T. Guimarães, Mauricio Roberto Veronez, Emilie C. Kost... Published: 10 March 2017
Sustainability, doi: 10.3390/su9030416
DOI See at publisher website ABS Show/hide abstract
Additional measures of in situ water quality monitoring in natural environments can be obtained through remote sensing because certain elements in water modify its spectral behavior. One of the indicators of water quality is the presence of algae, and the aim of this study was to propose an alternative method for the quantification of chlorophyll in water by correlating spectral data, infrared images, and limnology data. The object of study was an artificial lake located at Unisinos University, São Leopoldo/RS, Brazil. The area has been mapped with a modified NGB (near infrared (N), green (G) and blue (B)) camera coupled to an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). From the orthorectified and georeferenced images, a modified normalized difference vegetation index (NDVImod) image has been generated. Additionally, 20 sampling points have been established on the lake. At these points, in situ spectral analysis with a spectroradiometer has been performed, and water samples have been collected for laboratory determination of chlorophyll concentrations. The correlation resulted in two models. The first model, based on the multivariate analysis of spectral data, and the second model, based on polynomial equations from NDVI, had coefficients of determination (R2) of 0.86 and 0.51, respectively. This study confirmed the applicability of remote sensing for water resource management using UAVs, which can be characterized as a quick and easy methodology.
Article 4 Reads 1 Citation An algorithm for automatic detection and orientation estimation of planar structures in LiDAR-scanned outcrops Robson K. Gomes, Luiz P.L. De Oliveira, Luiz Gonzaga, Franci... Published: 01 May 2016
Computers & Geosciences, doi: 10.1016/j.cageo.2016.02.011
DOI See at publisher website
Article 3 Reads 5 Citations Multi-Temporal Patterns of Urban Heat Island as Response to Economic Growth Management Fabiane Bordin, Anibal Gusso, Cristina Cafruni, Mauricio Rob... Published: 16 March 2015
Sustainability, doi: 10.3390/su7033129
DOI See at publisher website ABS Show/hide abstract
For a reliable assessment of sustainability in big cities, it is imperative to evaluate urban ecosystem conditions and the environment of the cities undergoing economic growth. Urban green spaces are valuable sources of evapotranspiration, which is generated by trees and vegetation; these spaces mitigate urban heat islands in cities. Land surface temperature (LST) is closely related to the distribution of land-use and land-cover characteristics and can be used as an indicator of urban environment conditions and development. This study evaluates the patterns of LST distribution through time by employing the thermal spatial distribution signature procedure using thermal infrared data obtained from Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper. A set of 18 images, between 1985 and 2010, was used to study the urban environment during summer in 47 neighborhoods of Porto Alegre, Brazil. On a neighborhood scale, results show a non-linear inverse correlation (R² = 0.55) between vegetation index and LST. The overall average of the LST is 300.23 K (27.8 °C) with a standard deviation of 1.25 K and the maximum average difference of 2.83 K between neighborhoods. Results show that the Thermal Spatial Distribution Signature (TSDS) analysis can help multi-temporal studies for the evaluation of UHI through time.
CONFERENCE-ARTICLE 5 Reads 0 Citations Multitemporal Analysis of Thermal Distribution Characteristics for Urban Heat Islands Management Anibal Gusso, Fabiane Bordin, Mauricio Veronez, Cristina Caf... Published: 05 November 2014
The 4th World Sustainability Forum, doi: 10.3390/wsf-4-f009
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The evaluation of the urban ecosystem conditions and environment while cities that are still growing economically, are highly necessary for reliable assessment of sustainability in big cities. The urban green spaces are valuable sources of evapotranspiration process generated by trees and vegetation which mitigates urban heat islands (UHI) in the cities. The Land Surface Temperature (LST) is closely related to the distribution of Land Use and Land Cover (LULC) characteristics and can be used as an indicator of the urban environment conditions and development. This research evaluates the patterns of LST distribution by means the Thermal Spatial Distribution Signature (TSDS) procedure using Thermal Infrared (TIR) data obtained from Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper (TM). A set of eighteen images, between 1985 and 2009, were used to study the urban environment during the summer season, in 47 neighborhoods in the city of Porto Alegre, Brazil. At neighborhood scale, results show a non-linear inverse correlation (R2=0.55) between vegetation index and LST. The overall average of the LST is 300.23 K (27.8˚C) with a standard deviation of 1.25 K. The max difference found between neighborhoods was 2.83 K.
Article 3 Reads 3 Citations Combining SRP-PHAT and two Kinects for 3D Sound Source Localization Lucas Adams Seewald, Luiz Gonzaga, Mauricio Roberto Veronez,... Published: 01 November 2014
Expert Systems with Applications, doi: 10.1016/j.eswa.2014.05.033
DOI See at publisher website
Article 1 Read 64 Citations Admixture in Latin America: Geographic Structure, Phenotypic Diversity and Self-Perception of Ancestry Based on 7,342 In... Andrés Ruiz-Linares, Kaustubh Adhikari, Victor Acuña-Alonzo,... Published: 25 September 2014
PLOS Genetics, doi: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1004572
DOI See at publisher website PubMed View at PubMed ABS Show/hide abstract
The current genetic makeup of Latin America has been shaped by a history of extensive admixture between Africans, Europeans and Native Americans, a process taking place within the context of extensive geographic and social stratification. We estimated individual ancestry proportions in a sample of 7,342 subjects ascertained in five countries (Brazil, Chile, Colombia, México and Perú). These individuals were also characterized for a range of physical appearance traits and for self-perception of ancestry. The geographic distribution of admixture proportions in this sample reveals extensive population structure, illustrating the continuing impact of demographic history on the genetic diversity of Latin America. Significant ancestry effects were detected for most phenotypes studied. However, ancestry generally explains only a modest proportion of total phenotypic variation. Genetically estimated and self-perceived ancestry correlate significantly, but certain physical attributes have a strong impact on self-perception and bias self-perception of ancestry relative to genetically estimated ancestry. Latin America has a history of extensive mixing between Native Americans and people arriving from Europe and Africa. As a result, individuals in the region have a highly heterogeneous genetic background and show great variation in physical appearance. Latin America offers an excellent opportunity to examine the genetic basis of the differentiation in physical appearance between Africans, Europeans and Native Americans. The region is also an advantageous setting in which to examine the interplay of genetic, physical and social factors in relation to ethnic/racial self-perception. Here we present the most extensive analysis of genetic ancestry, physical diversity and self-perception of ancestry yet conducted in Latin America. We find significant geographic variation in ancestry across the region, this variation being consistent with demographic history and census information. We show that genetic ancestry impacts many aspects of physical appearance. We observe that self-perception is highly influenced by physical appearance, and that variation in physical appearance biases self-perception of ancestry relative to genetically estimated ancestry.
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