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Peter Newman   Professor  Institute, Department or Faculty Head 
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Peter Newman published an article in September 2018.
Top co-authors See all
Tan Yigitcanlar

200 shared publications

Civil Engineering and Built Environment, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia

Yasuo Takao

32 shared publications

Department of Social Sciences and International Studies, Curtin University, Perth, Australia

F. Schultmann

19 shared publications

Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT)

Vanessa Rauland

15 shared publications

Curtin University

Peter Newton

11 shared publications

Institute for Social Research, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne 3122, Australia

44
Publications
46
Reads
4
Downloads
82
Citations
Publication Record
Distribution of Articles published per year 
(2004 - 2018)
Publications See all
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Partnerships for Private Transit Investment—The History and Practice of Private Transit Infrastructure with a Case Study... Sebastian Davies-Slate, Peter Newman Published: 03 September 2018
Urban Science, doi: 10.3390/urbansci2030084
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Urban transit planning is going through a transition to greater private investment in many parts of the world and is now on the agenda in Australia. After showing examples of private investment in transit globally, the paper focuses on historical case studies of private rail investment in Western Australia. These case studies mirror the historical experience in rapidly growing railway cities in Europe, North America, and Asia (particularly Japan), and also the land grant railways that facilitated settlement in North America. The Western Australian experience is noteworthy for the small but rapidly growing populations of the settlements involved, suggesting that growth, rather than size, is the key to successfully raising funding for railways through land development. The paper shows through the history of transport, with particular reference to Perth, that the practice of private infrastructure provision can provide lessons for how to enable this again. It suggests that new partnerships with private transport investment as set out in the Federal Government City Deal process, should create many more opportunities to improve the future of cities through once again integrating transit, land development, and private finance.
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Economically Incentivising Smart Urban Regeneration. Case Study of Port Louis, Mauritius Zaheer Allam, Peter Newman Published: 09 August 2018
Smart Cities, doi: 10.3390/smartcities1010004
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Port Louis, the capital city of Mauritius, has been the preferred city for hosting the judicial, political and business activities of the country for the past two centuries. However, new policies have created nine new smart cities in greenfield locations within 10 km from Port Louis, so the capital city is facing economic decline as it is losing businesses, as well as administrative functions. This loss equates to an erosion in municipal revenue along with a reduced interest in contributing to the development of the city; all of which takes a toll on its urban economic landscape, as well as on the broader Mauritian economy. This paper builds from the findings of a focus group study to propose a smart urban regeneration model for the City of Port Louis, which could enable the old city to be restored and regenerated rather than redeveloped in modernist architecture, as has happened in the new smart cities model. A smart urban regeneration model is proposed backed by the pillars of smart infrastructure, culture, metabolism and governance. The proposed model is applied to the context of Port Louis to generate an urban regeneration scheme. The potential benefits in terms of financial outcomes, investment attraction and job creation are explored through a combined application of econometric forecasting models. The results support positive figures of both investment and job creation, and the findings of this study aim at informing and providing the governing bodies of Port Louis with a tangible solution for revamping the centuries-old capital city, as well as demonstrating to the world that smart cities can mean sensitive urban regeneration.
PREPRINT 0 Reads 0 Citations Partnerships for Private Transit Investment – The History and Practice of Private Transit Infrastructure with a Case Stu... Sebastian Davies-Slate, Peter Newman Published: 25 July 2018
doi: 10.20944/preprints201807.0466.v1
DOI See at publisher website
ABS Show/hide abstract
Urban transit planning is going through a transition to greater private investment in many parts of the world and is now on the agenda in Australia. After showing examples of private investment in transit globally the paper focuses on historical case studies of private rail investment in Western Australia. These case studies mirror the historical experience in rapidly growing railway cities in Europe, North America and Asia (particularly Japan), and also the land grant railways that facilitated settlement in North America. The Western Australian experience is noteworthy for the small but rapidly growing populations of the settlements involved, suggesting that growth, rather than size, is the key to successfully raising funding for railways through land development. The paper shows through the history of transport, with particular reference to Perth, that the practice of private infrastructure provision can provide lessons for how to enable this again. It suggests that new partnerships with private transport investment as set out in the Federal Government City Deal process, should create many more opportunities to improve the future of cities through once again integrating transit, land development and private finance.
Article 0 Reads 2 Citations Redefining the Smart City: Culture, Metabolism and Governance Zaheer Allam, Peter Newman Published: 17 July 2018
Smart Cities, doi: 10.3390/smartcities1010002
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The Smart City concept is still evolving and can be viewed as a branding exercise by big corporations, which is why the concept is not being used by the United Nations (U.N.). Smart Cities tend to represent the information, communication, and technological (ICT) industry alone without considering the values and cultural and historical profiles that some cities hold as legacies. However, the technology inherent in Smart Cities promises efficiencies and options that could allow cities to be more “inclusive, safe, resilient, and sustainable” as required by the U.N. agenda including cultural heritage. There is a notable lack of Smart City application to cultural and historical urban fabrics. Instead, the modernist new town approach has emerged under this new rubric leading to many problems such as urban decay and unsustainable car dependence. This study therefore presents a review of the literature on the nature, challenges, and opportunities of Smart Cities. A new Smart Cities framework is proposed based on the dimensions of culture, metabolism, and governance. These findings seek to inform policy makers of an alternative viewpoint on the Smart City paradigm, which focuses on urban outcomes rather than technology in isolation.
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Sustainability in an Emerging Nation: The Bhutan Case Study Dorji Yangka, Peter Newman, Vanessa Rauland, Peter Devereux Published: 18 May 2018
Sustainability, doi: 10.3390/su10051622
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With the onset of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the Paris Agreement on climate change, the world’s nations were to create economic development integrating environmental and social improvement. However, there is still much uncertainty in the world of politics and academia as to whether these integrated goals are achievable and how they can fit best with diverse national and local contexts. Thus, there is always a need to find nations that can show how it can be achieved in different settings shaped by local experiences, challenges, and opportunities. Bhutan could be one of these nations as it could be argued that it has, to an extent, simplified the task to fit its values and aspirations. Bhutan has three major goals that need to be integrated: Wealth (GDP) to align with their middle-income aspiration, thus providing opportunities for employment, Greenhouse Gas emissions (GHG) that are maintained at a carbon neutral level, which is beyond most national commitments, and Bhutan’s renowned Gross National Happiness (GNH) index, which covers their socio-economic goals. We show this integration and then synthesize some core findings from a literature review on the theory and practice of sustainable development through the lens of the three integrated goals of Bhutan, thereby placing the case of Bhutan into the wider literature. This paper seeks to show how one emerging nation can model an operational sustainability policy. The paper highlights some plausible synergies between the 17 SDGs and the domains and indicators of GNH that could help nations struggling with how they can create sensible sustainability outcomes from these new global agendas. Bhutan has framed the GNH as its contribution to sustainability. However, this paper suggests that it may be the integration of the GNH with GDP and GHG that is its real contribution. Furthermore, Bhutan’s 3G model of fully integrating GNH, GDP, and GHG suggests a way forward for achieving their imperatives of economic growth, whilst enabling the SDGs and achieving the difficult climate change goal. It may also suggest a model for other nations wanting to find a complementary way of framing economic growth, the 17 SDGs, and the Paris Agreement into a coherent set of policies.
Article 4 Reads 1 Citation Gentrification of station areas and its impact on transit ridership Jyothi Chava, Peter Newman, Reena Tiwari Published: 01 March 2018
Case Studies on Transport Policy, doi: 10.1016/j.cstp.2018.01.007
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