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Peter Newman   Professor  Institute, Department or Faculty Head 
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Peter Newman published an article in March 2018.
Top co-authors See all
Tan Yigitcanlar

91 shared publications

Frank Schultmann

20 shared publications

Vanessa Rauland

15 shared publications

Curtin University

Peter Newton

8 shared publications

Institute for Social Research, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne 3122, Australia

Timothy Beatley

7 shared publications

32
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41
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Publication Record
Distribution of Articles published per year 
(2010 - 2018)
Total number of journals
published in
 
13
 
Publications See all
Article 0 Reads 1 Citation Gentrification of station areas and its impact on transit ridership Jyothi Chava, Peter Newman, Reena Tiwari Published: 01 March 2018
Case Studies on Transport Policy, doi: 10.1016/j.cstp.2018.01.007
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Transit and transit-oriented developments (TODs) are gaining momentum across the globe to enable transport sustainability. However, most of these TODs are creating neighbourhood gentrification as a result of higher housing prices. Hence, the contribution of TOD policies towards sustainable transportation goals remains unclear. This paper uses Bangalore, India, as a case study to examine the effects of TOD gentrification on transit ridership. In Bangalore, station areas are witnessing the influx of large capital on condominiums, in response to TOD policies and accessibility to transit. These condominiums are expensive and attract the affluent, leading to new build gentrification. The study evaluates the impact of such new build gentrification on transit ridership. Data analysis suggests that, gentrifiers contribute significantly towards metro ridership because of the metro’s high level of service (LOS). However, the other sustainable mode shares among gentrifiers are less due to poor implementation of TOD policies and the low LOS of the bus system. The study reveals that metro is attracting TOD residents, especially intermediate public transport, bus and motorbike users, whose destination are locating within walkable distance from the metro stations and the willingness to use metro is high, once the fully integrated metro network is developed. The results indicate that the transit and TOD policies in Bangalore are indeed improving transit mode shares, but to ensure equity and optimize sustainable transport mode shares, more policy interventions are required for the provision of: affordable housing and encouraging diversity in new TODs; improving neighbourhood built environment; and mode integration measures.
BOOK-CHAPTER 0 Reads 0 Citations The Theology of Sustainability Practice Peter Newman Published: 01 January 2018
Handbook of Engaged Sustainability, doi: 10.1007/978-3-319-53121-2_6-2
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Reflecting on a lifetime of sustainability practice as an academic, politician, public servant, and community activist, I have drawn on how theology has provided the roots of engagement in tackling the issues of change. Understanding the role of cities in theological history enables us to see how the global and local, the personal and the political, are linked in the journey we need to take towards sustainability. Key themes will be how nature and cities are intertwined, the role of prophets, the competing visions of a future city that have guided urban planners for centuries, and the role of activism and good work as a source of hope in creating the city of the future.
BOOK-CHAPTER 0 Reads 0 Citations The Theology of Sustainability Practice Peter Newman Published: 01 January 2018
Handbook of Engaged Sustainability, doi: 10.1007/978-3-319-53121-2_6-1
DOI See at publisher website
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Reflecting on a lifetime of sustainability practice as an academic, politician, public servant, and community activist, I have drawn on how theology has provided the roots of engagement in tackling the issues of change. Understanding the role of cities in theological history enables us to see how the global and local, the personal and the political, are linked in the journey we need to take towards sustainability. Key themes will be how nature and cities are intertwined, the role of prophets, the competing visions of a future city that have guided urban planners for centuries, and the role of activism and good work as a source of hope in creating the city of the future.
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations The rise and rise of renewable cities Peter Newman Published: 01 January 2017
Renewable Energy and Environmental Sustainability, doi: 10.1051/rees/2017008
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The decoupling of fossil fuels from growth in economic activity has been proceeding rapidly for most of the 21st century and is analysed globally in terms of structures and technologies for energy efficiency and for switching to renewable energy in the world’s cities. This is leading to the decline of coal and oil. The evidence suggests that the changes are based on demand for the structures and technologies that are emerging, facilitating a disruptive process. The rise of renewable cities can therefore be expected to accelerate.
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Perth as a ‘big’ city Peter Newman Published: 01 August 2016
Thesis Eleven, doi: 10.1177/0725513616657906
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The bigness of cities has attracted much attention from urban academics and professionals whose perspective may be divided into two camps: productive science using agglomeration-based analysis or impact science using anxiety-based analysis. The two approaches need to be joined in order to resolve issues of urban ‘bigness’, and in this article the growth of Perth is used to illustrate the potential and challenges of this integration.
Article 0 Reads 8 Citations Theory of urban fabrics: planning the walking, transit/public transport and automobile/motor car cities for reduced car ... Peter Newman, Leo Kosonen, Jeff Kenworthy Published: 01 June 2016
Town Planning Review, doi: 10.3828/tpr.2016.28
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