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Carmen Dienst   Ms.  Senior Scientist or Principal Investigator 
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Carmen Dienst published an article in March 2015.
Top co-authors See all
Thomas Fischer

21 shared publications

China Meteorological Administration

Daniel Vallentin

5 shared publications

Wuppertal Institute for Climate, Environment and Energy/Doeppersberg 19, Wuppertal D-42109, Germany

Willington Ortiz

5 shared publications

Environment and Energy GmbH

Mathieu Saurat

4 shared publications

Wuppertal Institute for Climate, Environment and Energy/Doeppersberg 19, Wuppertal D-42109, Germany

Chun Xia

3 shared publications

Wuppertal Institute for Climate, Environment and Energy/Doeppersberg 19, Wuppertal D-42109, Germany

7
Publications
6
Reads
0
Downloads
36
Citations
Publication Record
Distribution of Articles published per year 
(2007 - 2015)
Total number of journals
published in
 
6
 
Publications See all
BOOK-CHAPTER 4 Reads 0 Citations The Role of Gender Concerns in the Planning of Small-Scale Energy Projects in Developing Countries Julia Terrapon-Pfaff, Carmen Dienst, Willington Ortiz Published: 04 March 2015
Springer Proceedings in Energy, doi: 10.1007/978-3-319-15964-5_25
DOI See at publisher website
Article 1 Read 0 Citations On Track to Become a Low Carbon Future City? First Findings of the Integrated Status Quo and Trends Assessment of the Pi... Carmen Dienst, Clemens Schneider, Chun Xia, Mathieu Saurat, ... Published: 31 July 2013
Sustainability, doi: 10.3390/su5083224
DOI See at publisher website ABS Show/hide abstract
The Low Carbon Future Cities (LCFC) project aims at facing a three dimensional challenge by developing an integrated city roadmap balancing: low carbon development, gains in resource efficiency and adaptation to climate change. The paper gives an overview of the first outcomes of the analysis of the status quo and assessment of the most likely developments regarding GHG emissions, climate impacts and resource use in Wuxi—the Chinese pilot city for the LCFC project. As a first step, a detailed emission inventory following the IPCC guidelines for Wuxi has been carried out. In a second step, the future development of energy demand and related CO2 emissions in 2050 were simulated in a current policy scenario (CPS). In parallel, selected aspects of material and water flows for the energy and the building sector were analyzed and modeled. In addition, recent and future climate impacts and vulnerability were investigated. Based on these findings, nine key sectors with high relevance to the three dimensions could be identified. Although Wuxi’s government has started a path to implement a low carbon plan, the first results show that, for the shift towards a sustainable low carbon development, more ambitious steps need to be taken in order to overcome the challenges faced.
Article 0 Reads 2 Citations Introducing Modern Energy Services into Developing Countries: The Role of Local Community Socio-Economic Structures Willington Ortiz, Carmen Dienst, Julia Terrapon-Pfaff Published: 05 March 2012
Sustainability, doi: 10.3390/su4030341
DOI See at publisher website ABS Show/hide abstract
Sustainable energy technologies are widely sought-after as essential elements in facing global challenges such as energy security, global warming and poverty reduction. However, in spite of their promising advantages, sustainable energy technologies make only a marginal contribution to meeting energy related needs in both industrialised and developing countries, in comparison to the widespread use of unsustainable technologies. One of the most significant constraints to their adoption and broad diffusion is the socio-economic context in which sustainable energy technologies are supposed to operate. The same holds true for community-based energy projects in developing countries supported by the WISIONS initiative. Practical strategies dealing with these socio-economic challenges are crucial elements for project design and, particularly, for the implementation of project activities. In this paper experiences from implementing community-based projects are reviewed in order to identify the practical elements that are relevant to overcome socio-economic challenges. In order to systematise the findings, an analytical framework is proposed, which combines analytical tools from the socio-technical transition framework and insights from participative approaches to development.
Article 0 Reads 1 Citation Future development of the upstream greenhouse gas emissions from natural gas industry, focussing on Russian gas fields a... Stefan Lechtenböhmer, C. Dienst Published: 01 August 2010
Journal of Integrative Environmental Sciences, doi: 10.1080/19438151003774463
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Natural gas makes an increasing contribution to the European Union's energy supply. Due to its efficiency and low level of combustion emissions this reduces greenhouse gas emissions compared to the use of other fossil fuels. However, being itself a potent greenhouse gas, a high level of direct losses of natural gas in its process chain could neutralise these advantages. Which effect will finally prevail depends on future economical as well as technical developments. Based on two different scenarios of the main influencing factors we can conclude that over the next two decades CH4 emissions from the natural gas supply chain can be significantly reduced, in spite of unfavourable developments of the supply structures. This, however, needs a substantial, but economically attractive investment into new technology, particularly in Russia.
Article 0 Reads 1 Citation Integrierte Treibhausgasbewertung der Prozessketten von Erdgas und industriellem Biomethan in Deutschland Integrated GHG... K. Arnold, C. Dienst, Stefan Lechtenböhmer Published: 13 March 2010
Umweltwissenschaften und Schadstoff-Forschung, doi: 10.1007/s12302-010-0125-6
DOI See at publisher website
Article 1 Read 27 Citations Renewable Energy Futures: Targets, Scenarios, and Pathways Eric Martinot, Carmen Dienst, Liu Weiliang, Chai Qimin Published: 01 November 2007
Annual Review of Environment and Resources, doi: 10.1146/annurev.energy.32.080106.133554
DOI See at publisher website
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