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Timeline of Christopher Brown

2018
Feb
01
Published new article




Article

Performance-Based Maintenance Contracting in Florida: Evaluation by Surveys, Statistics, and Content Analysis

Published: 01 February 2018 by American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) in Journal of Construction Engineering and Management

doi: 10.1061/(ASCE)CO.1943-7862.0001429

0 Reads | 0 Citations
2016
Mar
29
Published new article




Article

A Revised Brackish Water Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) Site Selection Index for Water Resources Management

Published: 29 March 2016 by Springer Nature in Water Resources Management

doi: 10.1007/s11269-016-1297-7

0 Reads | 4 Citations
2014
Nov
06
Published new article




Article

An assessment of seepage into the L-31N Canal along Northeast Everglades National Park, Florida, USA

Published: 06 November 2014 by Springer Nature in Environmental Earth Sciences

doi: 10.1007/s12665-014-3828-y

The hydrologic restoration of the Everglades ecosystem has been ongoing since 2000. One of the key planned projects is the control and management of seepage emanating from Northeast Everglades National Park and flowing to the L-31 North Canal that is part of the South Dade Conveyance System. In order to design the most efficient seepage management system, it is important to understand the overall trends in daily seepage from the Park into the canal system. Equally important is an assessment of the spatial distribution of seepage along the canal system. This research article provides an assessment of mean daily net seepage into the L-31 North Canal and one segment of the L-30 Canal from mid-1991 to end of 2010 using a water budget approach. Then the spatial distribution of seepage is determined by developing piece-meal water budgets from the northern part of the system to the southern terminus of L-31 North Canal at the S-331 water control structure. The overall interpretation of the water budget data is aided by a review of water level differences throughout the system as well as analysis of past seepage studies. Lastly, recommendations are provided that would permit continued monitoring of the water budget and better spatial assessment of water level data to enable more meaningful ecological restoration assessment to be realized. The paper concludes with a discussion of policy issues and suggestions for adaptive assessment improvement of the project going forward.

0 Reads | 0 Citations
2014
May
08
Published new article




Article

A multi-criteria assessment of the C-111 hydrologic restoration project – A case study

Published: 08 May 2014 by Springer Nature in Water Resources Management

doi: 10.1007/s11269-014-0614-2

The hydrologic restoration of the Everglades ecosystem is underway within the C-111 basin. Some early projects have been operating for over 10 years and can now be quantitatively assessed. Some recent research presented in Wetlands provides a good beginning. This research article complements those efforts with a broader project assessment by focusing on buffer lands east of Everglades National Park and in the adjacent water control canal system. This article reviews the restoration progress of the C-111 Project over 12 years against its original performance metrics established in 1999–2000 using a multi-criteria assessment methodology. The authors, including members of the original project design team, discuss the original design hypotheses and then organize the assessment into quantity, quality, timing, and distribution (e.g. QQTD) metrics consistent with the overall restoration objectives of the Everglades system. The assessment is unique given that the original designers were afforded a rare opportunity to see how well their restoration plan actually worked. The broad assessment that was completed includes a 28 year water budget of the L-31 N/C-111 Canal located on the boundary of the Everglades; an accounting of undesirable discharges to Barnes Sound/Manatee Bay; an assessment of hydrologic restoration of buffer land wetlands; an assessment of water quality in the study area; and, an assessment of flood impacts. The study results reveal a mixed record of success for the original restoration plan.

0 Reads | 2 Citations
2013
Apr
19
Published new article




Article

An assessment of geologic sequestration potential in the panhandle of Florida USA

Published: 19 April 2013 by Springer Nature in Environmental Earth Sciences

doi: 10.1007/s12665-013-2481-1

One alternative to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions is to store the emissions in underground geologic sequestration repositories. The efficacy of this approach has been favorably evaluated by numerous authors over the last 15 years. This paper discusses an assessment of the overall feasibility of storing emissions in three different repositories in the Florida panhandle located in the Southeastern United States. The feasibility assessment evaluates both saline aquifers and oil reservoirs located in the panhandle region. The overall feasibility is driven by the available geologic sequestration capacity, the transportation cost to deliver emissions to a respective repository, and other engineering and regulatory issues. The geologic sequestration capacity is generally controlled by the so-called storage efficiency, a variable dependent on the site-specific geology, reservoir conditions, and the injected fluid characteristics. For this paper, storage efficiency for saline repositories was assessed in more detail using numerical modeling. Based on the work completed, the 3 repositories studied have at least 4.55 gigatonnes of capacity to sequester CO2.

0 Reads | 8 Citations
2011
Dec
01
Published new article




Article

Planning, designing, operating, and regulating a geologic sequestration repository as an underground landfill--a review.

Published: 01 December 2011 in Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association

doi:

Geologic sequestration appears to be a technically feasible method of storing carbon dioxide in underground aquifers in order to lower greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere. The overall feasibility of geologic sequestration is still in question and as such, has been the focus of intense research over the past decade. Researchers have looked to the oil/gas industry and water well industry for lessons learned and technical knowledge, however, a better industry to emulate may well be the waste industry. Viewing geologic sequestration repositories as underground landfills has a great many benefits. First, there is a plethora of existing research and investigations that are directly analogous to geologic sequestration projects. Second, the regulatory framework is rather mature and can be easily adapted to serve geologic sequestration. This paper conducts an extensive literature search of the environmental, waste, and geologic sequestration literature to ascertain planning, design, and operational methodologies, lessons learned, and concepts that are directly useful for geologic sequestration to improve the technical and regulatory framework. Lastly, the paper uses a hypothetical underground landfill geologic sequestration site (ULGSS) in Florida, USA to discuss some of the findings and implications from the literature. It is concluded that there are a number of literature findings from the waste and environmental arena that should be adapted for geologic sequestration.

0 Reads | 0 Citations
2011
Nov
23
Published new article




Article

Planning, Designing, Operating, and Regulating a Geologic Sequestration Repository as an Underground Landfill—A Review

Published: 23 November 2011 by Informa UK Limited in Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association

doi: 10.1080/10473289.2011.626888

Geologic sequestration appears to be a technically feasible method of storing carbon dioxide in underground aquifers in order to lower greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere. The overall feasibility of geologic sequestration is still in question and as such, has been the focus of intense research over the past decade. Researchers have looked to the oil/gas industry and water well industry for lessons learned and technical knowledge, however, a better industry to emulate may well be the waste industry. Viewing geologic sequestration repositories as underground landfills has a great many benefits. First, there is a plethora of existing research and investigations that are directly analogous to geologic sequestration projects. Second, the regulatory framework is rather mature and can be easily adapted to serve geologic sequestration. This paper conducts an extensive literature search of the environmental, waste, and geologic sequestration literature to ascertain planning, design, and operational methodologies, lessons learned, and concepts that are directly useful for geologic sequestration to improve the technical and regulatory framework. Lastly, the paper uses a hypothetical underground landfill geologic sequestration site (ULGSS) in Florida, USA to discuss some of the findings and implications from the literature. It is concluded that there are a number of literature findings from the waste and environmental arena that should be adapted for geologic sequestration.

0 Reads | 1 Citations
2011
Oct
15
Published new article




Article

Graphical Planning Envelopes for Estimating the Surface Footprint of CO2 Plumes during CO2 Injection into Saline Aquifer...

Published: 15 October 2011 by Springer Nature in Natural Resources Research

doi: 10.1007/s11053-011-9155-z

This article presents research regarding the storage or sequestration of carbon dioxide in deep, saline aquifers. Building upon existing research and supplementing it with new numerical modeling simulations, a set of graphical planning curves was developed. Each graphical planning curve plots the value of Ω or the normalized surface footprint per kilogram of CO2 injected versus the aquifer anisotropy ratio. The planning curves present one planning envelope that is subdivided into two parts. One portion of the envelope governs the planning for active injection operations of geologic storage projects typically lasting less than 100 years. The second portion of the envelope governs the planning for long-term monitoring of the carbon dioxide plume as it evolves from mostly free-phase or highly concentrated aqueous-phase carbon dioxide to entirely dilute aqueous-phase carbon dioxide. This approach is innovative and useful for practitioners since it provides a simple way to estimate the CO2 surface footprint regardless of the aquifer anisotropy. Previous approaches for estimating the footprint usually assumed an isotropic and homogeneous aquifer storage zone.

0 Reads | 1 Citations
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