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Pius Lee   Dr.  Research or Laboratory Scientist 
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Pius Lee published an article in December 2018.
Top co-authors See all
Menghua Wang

108 shared publications

NOAA/NESDIS Center for Satellite Applications and Research, College Park, MD, USA

Tianfeng Chai

49 shared publications

NOAA Air Resources Laboratory (ARL), NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, 5830 University Research Court, College Park, MD 20740, USA

Yang Liu

45 shared publications

Department of Environmental Health, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA

Daniel Q. Tong

39 shared publications

NOAA Air Resources Laboratory

Shobha Kondragunta

34 shared publications

NOAA/NESDIS Center for Satellite Applications and Research, 5825 University Research Court, College Park, MD 20740, USA

53
Publications
46
Reads
2
Downloads
127
Citations
Publication Record
Distribution of Articles published per year 
(2008 - 2018)
Total number of journals
published in
 
17
 
Publications See all
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Examination of the Physical Atmosphere in the Great Lakes Region and Its Potential Impact on Air Quality—Overwater Stabi... Richard T. McNider, Arastoo Pour-Biazar, Kevin Doty, Andrew ... Published: 01 December 2018
Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, doi: 10.1175/jamc-d-17-0355.1
DOI See at publisher website
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Satellite-Based Daily PM2.5 Estimates During Fire Seasons in Colorado Guannan Geng, Nancy L. Murray, Daniel Tong, Joshua S. Fu, Xu... Published: 03 August 2018
Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, doi: 10.1029/2018jd028573
DOI See at publisher website
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Application of satellite observations in conjunction with aerosol reanalysis to characterize long-range transport of Afr... Sheng-Po Chen, Cheng-Hsuan Lu, Jeff McQueen, Pius Lee Published: 01 August 2018
Atmospheric Environment, doi: 10.1016/j.atmosenv.2018.05.038
DOI See at publisher website
Article 1 Read 0 Citations Ammonia emissions from biomass burning in the continental United States Casey D. Bray, William Battye, Viney P. Aneja, Daniel Q. Ton... Published: 01 August 2018
Atmospheric Environment, doi: 10.1016/j.atmosenv.2018.05.052
DOI See at publisher website
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations A Conservative Downscaling of Satellite-Detected Chemical Compositions: NO2 Column Densities of OMI, GOME-2, and CMAQ Hyun Cheol Kim, Sang-Mi Lee, Tianfeng Chai, Fong Ngan, Li Pa... Published: 23 June 2018
Remote Sensing, doi: 10.3390/rs10071001
DOI See at publisher website ABS Show/hide abstract
A conservative downscaling technique was applied when comparing nitrogen dioxide (NO2) column densities from space-borne observations and a fine-scale regional model. The conservative downscaling was designed to enhance the spatial resolution of satellite measurements by applying the fine-scale spatial structure from the model, with strict mass conservation at each satellite footprint pixel level. With the downscaling approach, NO2 column densities from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI; 13 × 24 km nadir footprint resolution) and the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2; 40 × 80 km) show excellent agreement with the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ; 4 × 4 km) NO2 column densities, with R = 0.96 for OMI and R = 0.97 for GOME-2. We further introduce an approach to reconstruct surface NO2 concentrations by combining satellite column densities and simulated surface-to-column ratios from the model. Compared with the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Air Quality System (AQS) surface observations, the reconstructed surface concentrations show a good agreement; R = 0.86 for both OMI and GOME-2. This study demonstrates that the conservative downscaling approach is a useful tool to compare coarse-scale satellites with fine-scale models or observations in urban areas for air quality and emissions studies. The reconstructed fine-scale surface concentration field could be used for future epidemiology and urbanization studies.
Article 0 Reads 1 Citation The implementation of NEMS GFS Aerosol Component (NGAC) Version 2.0 for global multispecies forecasting at NOAA/NCEP – P... Jun Wang, Partha S. Bhattacharjee, Vijay Tallapragada, Cheng... Published: 19 June 2018
Geoscientific Model Development, doi: 10.5194/gmd-11-2315-2018
DOI See at publisher website ABS Show/hide abstract
The NEMS GFS Aerosol Component Version 2.0 (NGACv2) for global multispecies aerosol forecast has been developed at the National Centers of Environment Prediction (NCEP) in collaboration with the NESDIS Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR), the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), and the University at Albany, State University of New York (SUNYA). This paper describes the continuous development of the NGAC system at NCEP after the initial global dust-only forecast implementation (NGAC version 1.0, NGACv1). With NGACv2, additional sea salt, sulfate, organic carbon, and black carbon aerosol species were included. The smoke emissions are from the NESDIS STAR's Global Biomass Burning Product (GBBEPx), blended from the global biomass burning emission product from a constellation of geostationary satellites (GBBEP-Geo) and GSFC's Quick Fire Emission Data Version 2 from a polar-orbiting sensor (QFED2). This implementation advanced the global aerosol forecast capability and made a step forward toward developing a global aerosol data assimilation system. The aerosol products from this system have been used by many applications such as for regional air quality model lateral boundary conditions, satellite sea surface temperature (SST) physical retrievals, and the global solar insolation estimation. Positive impacts have been seen in these applications.
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