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James Blignaut  - - - 
Top co-authors See all
James Aronson

135 shared publications

Michael T. Smith

105 shared publications

Joshua Farley

61 shared publications

Department of Community Development and Applied Economics, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont, USA

Roula Inglesi-Lotz

38 shared publications

Daniel Renison

36 shared publications

Cátedra de Ecología, FCEFyN, Univ. Nacional de Córdoba – CONICET, Córdoba, Argentina

28
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0
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148
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Publication Record
Distribution of Articles published per year 
(2005 - 2017)
Total number of journals
published in
 
17
 
Publications See all
Article 2 Reads 3 Citations Conceptual Frameworks and References for Landscape-scale Restoration: Reflecting Back and Looking Forward , James Aronson, James N. Blignaut Published: 11 August 2017
Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden, doi: 10.3417/2017003
DOI See at publisher website
ABS Show/hide abstract
We review some of the most commonly known models in restoration ecology from the past 20 years. From these, we seek to identify essential elements required for the scaling-up and mainstreaming of restoration and, based on that, develop a new framework that could be used to assist in the realization of long-lasting and effective restoration policies and programs at the landscape and larger spatial scales. We argue that the reference model is particularly important at a time when there are urgent calls and investments for scaling-up restoration to the landscape scale. At that scale, we argue, it is essential to consider both ecological restoration and ecological rehabilitation as just two of the various components in a “family” of restorative activities that must be deployed, including changed management practices for agriculture, to make ongoing human activities and land uses more ecologically sound and sustainable. In conclusion, we present a new model that could help orient if not actually design planning, monitoring and evaluation, scaling-up, and applying restorative activities in new areas.
Article 1 Read 0 Citations The amenity value of Abu Dhabi's coastal and marine resources to its beach visitors James Blignaut, Myles Mander, Roula Inglesi-Lotz, Jane Glava... Published: 01 June 2016
Ecosystem Services, doi: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.04.005
DOI See at publisher website
Article 2 Reads 0 Citations A categorisation and evaluation of rhino management policies Douglas J. Crookes, James N. Blignaut Published: 20 May 2016
Development Southern Africa, doi: 10.1080/0376835x.2016.1179100
DOI See at publisher website
Article 1 Read 4 Citations Debunking the myth that a legal trade will solve the rhino horn crisis: A system dynamics model for market demand Douglas J. Crookes, James N. Blignaut Published: 01 November 2015
Journal for Nature Conservation, doi: 10.1016/j.jnc.2015.08.001
DOI See at publisher website
PREPRINT 2 Reads 0 Citations A Categorisation and Evaluation of Rhino Management Policies Douglas J. Crookes, James N. Blignaut Published: 01 January 2015
ABS Show/hide abstract
Rhino populations are at a critical level and new approaches are needed to ensure their survival. This study conducts a review and categorisation of policies for the management of rhinos. Twenty seven policies are identified and classified into in situ (reserve based) and ex situ (market based) policies. The policies are then evaluated based on four target areas: poachers/hunters; consumers; intermediaries and the game reserves themselves. The study finds that protected areas management policies seem most beneficial in the short run, in particular the enforcement of private property rights over resource utilisation, as well as the establishment of wildlife sanctuaries that act as sustainable breeding grounds for rhino populations.
PREPRINT 1 Read 0 Citations A categorisation and evaluation of rhino management policies Douglas J. Crookes, James N. Blignaut Published: 01 January 2015
ABS Show/hide abstract
Rhino populations are at a critical level and new approaches are needed to ensure their survival. This study conducts a review and categorisation of policies for the management of rhinos. Twenty seven policies are identified and classified into in situ (reserve based) and ex situ (market based) policies. The policies are then evaluated based on four target areas: poachers/hunters; consumers; intermediaries and the game reserves themselves. The study finds that protected areas management policies seem most beneficial in the short run, in particular the enforcement of private property rights over resource utilisation, as well as the establishment of wildlife sanctuaries that act as sustainable breeding grounds for rhino populations.