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Jaak Jaagus  - - - 
Top co-authors See all
Tim R. McVicar

69 shared publications

CSIRO Land and Water Canberra Australian Capital Territory Australia

Ülo Suursaar

62 shared publications

Estonian Marine Institute, University of Tartu, Tallinn, Estonia

H. Tõnisson

25 shared publications

Institute of Ecology, Tallinna University, Tallinn, Estonia

Miquel Tomas-Burguera

23 shared publications

Estación Experimental de Aula Dei, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (IPE-CSIC); Zaragoza Spain

Marina Peña-Gallardo

22 shared publications

Instituto Pirenaico de Ecología, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (IPE-CSIC), Zaragoza, Spain

15
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24
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Publication Record
Distribution of Articles published per year 
(2005 - 2017)
Total number of journals
published in
 
12
 
Publications See all
Conference 17 Reads 0 Citations Spatial and temporal variability of droughts in Estonia (1951-2015) Fernando Domínguez-Castro, Sergio Vicente-Serrano, Jaak Jaag... Published: 11 November 2017
First International Electronic Conference on the Hydrological Cycle, doi: 10.3390/chycle-2017-04883
DOI See at publisher website
Conference 15 Reads 0 Citations Climatic influence on atmospheric evaporative demand in Estonia (1951-2015) Fernando Domínguez-Castro, Sergio Vicente-Serrano, Jaak Jaag... Published: 08 November 2017
First International Electronic Conference on the Hydrological Cycle, doi: 10.3390/chycle-2017-04860
DOI See at publisher website
Article 2 Reads 1 Citation Trends and regime shifts in climatic conditions and river runoff in Estonia during 1951–2015 Jaak Jaagus, Mait Sepp, Toomas Tamm, Arvo Järvet, Kiira Mõis... Published: 03 November 2017
Earth System Dynamics, doi: 10.5194/esd-8-963-2017
DOI See at publisher website ABS Show/hide abstract
Time series of monthly, seasonal and annual mean air temperature, precipitation, snow cover duration and specific runoff of rivers in Estonia are analysed for detecting of trends and regime shifts during 1951–2015. Trend analysis is realised using the Mann–Kendall test and regime shifts are detected with the Rodionov test (sequential t-test analysis of regime shifts). The results from Estonia are related to trends and regime shifts in time series of indices of large-scale atmospheric circulation. Annual mean air temperature has significantly increased at all 12 stations by 0.3–0.4Kdecade−1. The warming trend was detected in all seasons but with the higher magnitude in spring and winter. Snow cover duration has decreased in Estonia by 3–4 daysdecade−1. Changes in precipitation are not clear and uniform due to their very high spatial and temporal variability. The most significant increase in precipitation was observed during the cold half-year, from November to March and also in June. A time series of specific runoff measured at 21 stations had significant seasonal changes during the study period. Winter values have increased by 0.4–0.9Ls−1km−2decade−1, while stronger changes are typical for western Estonia and weaker changes for eastern Estonia. At the same time, specific runoff in April and May have notably decreased indicating the shift of the runoff maximum to the earlier time, i.e. from April to March. Air temperature, precipitation, snow cover duration and specific runoff of rivers are highly correlated in winter determined by the large-scale atmospheric circulation. Correlation coefficients between the Arctic Oscillation (AO) and North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) indices reflecting the intensity of westerlies, and the studied variables were 0.5–0.8. The main result of the analysis of regime shifts was the detection of coherent shifts for air temperature, snow cover duration and specific runoff in the late 1980s, mostly since the winter of 1988/1989, which are, in turn, synchronous with the shifts in winter circulation. For example, runoff abruptly increased in January, February and March but decreased in April. Regime shifts in annual specific runoff correspond to the alternation of wet and dry periods. A dry period started in 1964 or 1963, a wet period in 1978 and the next dry period at the beginning of the 21st century.
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Trends and regime shifts in climatic conditions and river runoff in Estonia during 1951–2015 Mait Sepp, Toomas Tamm, Arvo Järvet, Kiira Mõisja, Jaak Jaag... Published: 20 March 2017
Earth System Dynamics Discussions, doi: 10.5194/esd-2017-24
DOI See at publisher website ABS Show/hide abstract
Time series of monthly, seasonal and annual mean air temperature, precipitation, snow cover duration and specific runoff of rivers in Estonia are analysed for detecting trends and regime shifts during 1951–2015. Trend analysis is performed using the Mann-Kendall test and regime shifts are detected with the Rodionov test (Sequential T-test Analysis of Regime Shifts). The results from Estonia are related to trends and regime shifts in time series of indices of large-scale atmospheric circulation. Annual mean air temperature has significantly increased at 12 observed stations by 0.3–0.4 K per decade. The warming trend was detected in all seasons but with the higher magnitude in spring and winter. Snow cover duration has decreased in Estonia by 3–4 days per decade. Changes in precipitation are not clear and uniform due to their very high spatial and temporal variability. The most significant increase in precipitation was observed during the cold half-year, from November to March. Time series of specific runoff measured at 21 stations has had significant seasonal changes during the study period. Winter values have increased by 0.4–0.9 l/s per km2 per decade while stronger changes are typical for western Estonia and weaker changes for eastern Estonia. At the same time, specific runoff in April and May has notably decreased indicating the shift of the runoff maximum to earlier time, i.e. from April to March. All meteorological and hydrological variables are highly correlated in winter, determined by the large-scale atmospheric circulation. Correlation coefficients between the Arctic Oscillation (AO) and North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) indices reflecting the intensity of westerlies, and the studied variables were 0.5–0.8. The main result of the analysis of regime shifts was the detection of coherent shifts for air temperature, snow cover duration and specific runoff in the late 1980s, mostly since the winter 1988/1989, which are, in turn, synchronous with the shifts in winter circulation. For example, runoff abruptly increased in January, February and March but decreased in April. Regime shifts in the annual specific runoff correspond to the alternation of wet and dry periods. A dry period started since 1964 or 1963, a wet period since 1978 and the next dry period since the beginning of the 21st century.
Article 0 Reads 2 Citations Changes in precipitation regime in the Baltic countries in 1966–2015 Jaak Jaagus, Agrita Briede, Egidijus Rimkus, Mait Sepp Published: 03 November 2016
Theoretical and Applied Climatology, doi: 10.1007/s00704-016-1990-8
DOI See at publisher website
Article 3 Reads 5 Citations How to quantify long-term changes in coastal sea storminess? Ülo Suursaar, J. Jaagus, H. Tõnisson Published: 01 April 2015
Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, doi: 10.1016/j.ecss.2014.08.001
DOI See at publisher website
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