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Kabir Khan  - - - 
Top co-authors See all
Jerzy Leszczynski

824 shared publications

Interdisciplinary Center for Nanotoxicity, Department of Chemistry, Physics and Atmospheric Sciences, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS-39217, USA

Hans Sanderson

62 shared publications

National Environmental Research Institute, Department of Policy Analysis, Aarhus University, Frederiksborgvej 399, Post Box 358, DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark

Supratik Kar

56 shared publications

Interdisciplinary Center for Nanotoxicity, Department of Chemistry, Physics and Atmospheric Sciences, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS-39217, USA

Christopher Buckley

52 shared publications

David Briggs

46 shared publications

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Publication Record
Distribution of Articles published per year 
(2011 - 2018)
Total number of journals
published in
 
5
 
Publications
PROCEEDINGS-ARTICLE 10 Reads 0 Citations Ecotoxicological assessment of pharmaceuticals using computational toxicology approaches: QSTR and interspecies QTTR mod... Kunal Roy, Kabir Khan, Supratik Kar, Hans Sanderson, Jerzy L... Published: 23 February 2018
Proceedings of MOL2NET 2017, International Conference on Multidisciplinary Sciences, 3rd edition, doi: 10.3390/mol2net-03-05129
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Although pharmaceuticals have been released into the environment for decades with seemingly no or very little care, their environmental toxicity has been studied experimentally only to a limited extent until today. There are reports of measurable quantities of drug molecules and other bioactive metabolites in rivers and other surface water bodies (mg/L range), notably in China and India where bulk production occurs. It is virtually impossible to carry out experimental evaluation of the impact of pharmaceuticals on all relevant and exposed organisms – this is also both unethical, costly and slow. However, computational tools such as Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) can be used to fill the data gaps where limited number of experimental data is available. In the current study, we have developed Quantitative Structure-Toxicity Relationship (QSTR) models for toxicity of pharmaceuticals on three different organisms namely algae, daphnia and fish. In order to study relationships between structural features and toxicity responses we developed models by partial least squares regression approach using descriptors selected through a genetic algorithm approach. The novel developed models were subsequently extensively validated following OECD guidelines. An additional interspecies quantitative structure-toxicity-toxicity relationship (QSTTR) modelling was performed to check for the interrelationship of various pattern of response as we moved across the hierarchy of genetics in different taxonomical class. Various descriptor calculating software such as PaDEL-Descriptor, DRAGON and SiRMS were used to compute a wide array of 2D descriptors for capturing chemical information required to correlate the biological properties (toxicities) inherited in the chemical structure of the molecules. All the obtained models showed that with an increase in hydrophobic characteristics (in terms of Log P) toxicity also increases linearly while with an increase in hydrogen bond donating groups, toxicity decreases. An applicability domain study was carried out in order to define the scope of developed model and to highlight compounds falling outside the domain of the respective models. The obtained QSTTR models were finally utilized to fill the data gaps of 275 pharmaceuticals, by using as a template to predict toxicity of pharmaceuticals where experimental data were missing for at least one of the endpoints. Finally, the developed QSTR models were used to predict a large dataset of approximately 7000 drug like molecules in order to prioritize the existing drug like substances in accordance to their acute predicted aquatic toxicities. Keywords: QSAR, QSTR, QSTTR, Ecotoxicity, Pharmaceuticals References
Article 1 Read 3 Citations A disease-linked ULBP6 polymorphism inhibits NKG2D-mediated target cell killing by enhancing the stability of NKG2D liga... Jianmin Zuo, Carrie R. Willcox, Fiyaz Mohammed, Martin Davey... Published: 30 May 2017
Science Signaling, doi: 10.1126/scisignal.aai8904
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Distracting natural killer cellsNatural killer (NK) cells target virally infected and transformed cells for cytolysis. When sufficient activating receptors on the NK cell surface, such as NKG2D, are engaged by ligands on the target cell, such as ULBP proteins, the NK cell kills the target. Polymorphisms within ULBP-encoding genes are associated with immune dysfunction. Zuo et al. found that the affinity of a commonly occurring ULBP6 variant for NKG2D was greater than that of the wild-type protein, which impaired NK cell activation. A soluble form of this protein variant bound so tightly to NKG2D that it suppressed receptor activation and target cell killing in response to other NKG2D ligands. Together, these data suggest that targeting NK cell–ligand interactions may provide therapies to modulate the strength of immune responses. AbstractNKG2D (natural killer group 2, member D) is an activating receptor found on the surface of immune cells, including natural killer (NK) cells, which regulates innate and adaptive immunity through recognition of the stress-induced ligands ULBP1 (UL16 binding protein 1) to ULBP6 and MICA/B. Similar to class I human leukocyte antigen (HLA), these NKG2D ligands have a major histocompatibility complex–like fold and exhibit pronounced polymorphism, which influences human disease susceptibility. However, whereas class I HLA polymorphisms occur predominantly in the α1α2 groove and affect antigen binding, the effects of most NKG2D ligand polymorphisms are unclear. We studied the molecular and functional consequences of the two major alleles of ULBP6, the most polymorphic ULBP gene, which are associated with autoimmunity and relapse after stem cell transplantation. Surface plasmon resonance and crystallography studies revealed that the arginine-to-leucine polymorphism within ULBP0602 affected the NKG2D-ULBP6 interaction by generating an energetic hotspot. This resulted in an NKG2D-ULBP0602 affinity of 15.5 nM, which is 10- to 1000-fold greater than the affinities of other ULBP-NKG2D interactions and limited NKG2D-mediated activation. In addition, soluble ULBP0602 exhibited high-affinity competitive binding for NKG2D and partially suppressed NKG2D-mediated activation of NK cells by other NKG2D ligands. These effects resulted in a decrease in a range of NKG2D-mediated effector functions. Our results reveal that ULBP polymorphisms affect the strength of human lymphocyte responses to cellular stress signals and may offer opportunities for therapeutic intervention.
Conference 2 Reads 0 Citations 04.08 Members of the type 14 c-type lectin family protect from inflammatory arthritis but differentially regulate bone e... Amy Naylor, Corinna Wehmeyer, Adam Croft, Kabir Khan, Atif S... Published: 01 March 2017
37th European Workshop for Rheumatology Research 2–4 March 2017 Athens, Greece, doi: 10.1136/annrheumdis-2016-211051.8
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Article 1 Read 7 Citations Sprouting angiogenesis is regulated by shedding of the C-type lectin family 14, member A (CLEC14A) ectodomain, catalyzed... Peter J. Noy, Rajeeb K. Swain, Kabir Khan, Puja Lodhia, Roy ... Published: 01 June 2016
The FASEB Journal, doi: 10.1096/fj.201500122r
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C-type lectin family 14, member A (CLEC14A), is a single-pass transmembrane glycoprotein that is overexpressed in tumor endothelial cells, and it promotes sprouting angiogenesis and modulates endothelial function via interactions with extracellular matrix proteins. Here, we show that CLEC14A is cleaved by rhomboid-like protein 2 (RHBDL2), one of 3 catalytic mammalian rhomboid-like (RHBDL) proteases, but that it is not cleaved by RHBDL1 or -3. Site-directed mutagenesis identified the precise site at which RHBDL2 cleaves CLEC14A, and targeted, small interfering RNAs that knockdown endogenous CLEC14A and RHBDL2 in human endothelial cells validated the specificity of CLEC14A shedding by RHBDL2. Loss of endogenous cleaved CLEC14A increased endothelial migration 2-fold, whereas that addition of recombinant cleaved CLEC14A inhibited the sprouting of human and murine endothelial cells 3-fold in several in vitro models. We assessed the in vivo role of cleaved CLEC14A in angiogenesis by using the rodent subcutaneous sponge implant model, and we found that CLEC14A protein inhibited vascular density by >50%. Finally, we show that cleaved CLEC14A binds to sprouting endothelial tip cells. Our data show that the ectodomain of CLEC14A regulates sprouting angiogenesis and suggests a role for RHBDL2 in endothelial function.—Noy, P. J., Swain, R. K., Khan, K., Lodhia, P., Bicknell, R. Sprouting angiogenesis is regulated by shedding of the C-type lectin family 14, member A (CLEC14A) ectodomain, catalyzed by rhomboid-like 2 protein (RHBDL2).
Article 1 Read 23 Citations The emerging role of tetraspanin microdomains on endothelial cells Rebecca L. Bailey, Kabir Khan, Victoria L. Heath, Michael G.... Published: 21 November 2011
Biochemical Society Transactions, doi: 10.1042/bst20110745
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Tetraspanins function as organizers of the cell surface by recruiting specific partner proteins into tetraspanin-enriched microdomains, which regulate processes such as cell adhesion, signalling and intracellular trafficking. Endothelial cells appear to express at least 23 of the 33 human tetraspanins, and a number of recent studies have demonstrated their importance in endothelial cell biology. Tetraspanin CD151 is essential for pathological angiogenesis, which may in part be due to regulation of its main partner proteins, the laminin-binding integrins α3β1, α6β1 and α6β4. CD9 and CD151 are essential for leucocyte recruitment during an inflammatory response, through the formation of pre-assembled nano-platforms containing the adhesion molecules ICAM-1 (intercellular adhesion molecule 1) and VCAM-1 (vascular cell adhesion molecule 1), which ultimately coalesce to form docking structures around captured leucocytes. Tetraspanin CD63 also facilitates leucocyte capture by promoting clustering of the adhesion molecule P-selectin. Finally, Tspan12 is required for blood vessel development in the eye, through regulation of Norrin-induced Frizzled-4 signalling, such that Tspan12 mutations can lead to human disease. Future studies on these and other endothelial tetraspanins are likely to provide further novel insights into angiogenesis and inflammation.