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Eric Etter  - - - 
Top co-authors See all
Alexandre Caron

116 shared publications

CIRAD, EMVT Department, Integrated Wildlife Management Unit, 34398 Montpellier, France

Christophe Chartier

58 shared publications

AFSSA-Niort Laboratoire de Recherches Caprines, 60 rue de Pied de Fond, BP 3081, 79012 Niort Cedex, France

Renaud Lancelot

49 shared publications

Centre International en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement (CIRAD), UMR CIRAD-INRA Contrôle des maladies animales exotiques et émergentes, Campus international de Baillarguet, 34398 Montpellier Cedex 5, France

Christine Koch

44 shared publications

INRA Tours, Station de pathologie aviaire et de parasitologie, 37380 Nouzilly, France

Annelise Tran

40 shared publications

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Publication Record
Distribution of Articles published per year 
(2000 - 2016)
Total number of journals
published in
 
6
 
Publications
Article 1 Read 2 Citations Transmission of foot and mouth disease at the wildlife/livestock interface of the Kruger National Park, South Africa: Ca... Ferran Jori, Eric Etter Published: 01 April 2016
Preventive Veterinary Medicine, doi: 10.1016/j.prevetmed.2016.01.016
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Highlights•Since 2000, the efficacy of foot and mouth disease (FMD) control at the edge of Kruger National Park (KNP) has deteriorated and needs urgent action.•This model quantifies the risk of FMD transmission from buffalo to cattle and fits with past and current numbers of outbreaks in the study area.•The model takes into account variability and uncertainty of key ecological and epidemiological parameters linked with FMD transmission.•Several management and control strategies are presented and their impact in FMD transmission is discussed.•The model can be used as an assessment tool for control strategies in other wildlife–livestock interface areas in the Southern African region. AbstractIn Southern Africa, the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) is the natural reservoir of foot and mouth disease (FMD). Contacts between this species and cattle are responsible for most of the FMD outbreaks in cattle at the edge of protected areas, which generate huge economic losses. During the late 1980’s and 90’s, the erection of veterinary cordon fences and the regular vaccination of cattle exposed to buffalo contact at the interface of the Kruger National Park (KNP), proved to be efficient to control and prevent FMD outbreaks in South Africa. However, since 2000, the efficiency of those measures has deteriorated, resulting in an increased rate of FMD outbreaks in cattle outside KNP, currently occurring more than once a year.Based on retrospective ecological and epidemiological data, we developed a stochastic quantitative model to assess the annual risk of FMD virus (FMDV) transmission from buffalo to cattle herds present at the KNP interface. The model suggests that good immunization of approximately 75% of the cattle population combined with a reduction of buffalo/cattle contacts is an efficient combination to reduce FMDV transmission to one infective event every 5.5 years, emulating the epidemiological situation observed at the end of the 20th century, before current failure of control measures. The model also indicates that an increasing number of buffalo present in the KNP and crossing its boundaries, combined with a reduction in the vaccination coverage of cattle herds at the interface, increases 3-fold the risk of transmission (one infective event per year).The model proposed makes biological sense and provides a good representation of current knowledge of FMD ecology and epidemiology in Southern Africa which can be used to discuss with stakeholders on different management options to control FMD at the wildlife livestock interface and updated if new information becomes available. It also suggests that the control of FMD at the KNP interface is becoming increasingly challenging and will probably require alternative approaches to control this disease and its economic impact.
Article 1 Read 5 Citations Can Environmental and Socioeconomic Factors Explain the Recent Emergence of Rift Valley Fever in Yemen, 2000–2001? Shaif Abdo-Salem, Annelise Tran, Vladimir Grosbois, Guillaum... Published: 01 June 2011
Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases, doi: 10.1089/vbz.2010.0084
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Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a major vector-borne zoonosis first identified on the African continent in the early 1900s. In 2000, RVF was reported for the first time in Yemen. In this study, we provide a descriptive analysis of the period 1999-2007 in Yemen, taking into account the environmental and socioeconomic factors likely to have been involved in the emergence of RVF in the country. We characterize each year in the study period by the environmental conditions (linked to vegetation indexes), the festival calendar, and economic data. We then use a principal component analysis to synthesize the different variables, assess whether the year 2000 was atypical compared with other years in the study period, and, if that was the case, in what respect. Our results show that 2000 presented above-normal vegetation index values, which reflect important precipitation, for both the two rainy seasons (the first between March and May; the second between July and October). These environmental conditions, ones favorable to mosquito vector populations, coincided that year with a late (March) starting date of the Eid al-Kabeer festival, which corresponds to a period with high host (cattle, sheep, goats) densities. According to these criteria, 2000 was an atypical year. These conclusions suggest that it is important to consider social variables in addition to environmental ones when assessing the risk of RVF emergence.
Article 1 Read 2 Citations Feeding behaviour of potential vectors of West Nile virus in Senegal Assane G Fall, Amadou Diaïté, Renaud Lancelot, Annelise Tran... Published: 01 January 2011
Parasites & Vectors, doi: 10.1186/1756-3305-4-99
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Background West Nile virus (WNV) is a widespread pathogen maintained in an enzootic cycle between mosquitoes and birds with occasional spill-over into dead-end hosts such as horses and humans. Migratory birds are believed to play an important role in its dissemination from and to the Palaearctic area, as well as its local dispersion between wintering sites. The Djoudj Park, located in Senegal, is a major wintering site for birds migrating from Europe during the study period (Sept. 2008- Jan. 2009). In this work, we studied the seasonal feeding behaviour dynamics of the potential WNV mosquito vectors at the border of the Djoudj Park, using a reference trapping method (CDC light CO2-baited traps) and two host-specific methods (horse- and pigeon-baited traps). Blood meals of engorged females were analysed to determine their origin. Results Results indicated that Culex tritaeniorhynchus and Cx. neavei may play a key role in the WNV transmission dynamics, the latter being the best candidate bridging-vector species between mammals and birds. Moreover, the attractiveness of pigeon- and horse-baited traps for Cx. neavei and Cx. tritaeniorhynchus varied with time. Finally, Cx. tritaeniorhynchus was only active when the night temperature was above 20°C, whereas Cx. neavei was active throughout the observation period. Conclusions Cx. neavei and Cx. tritaeniorhynchus are the main candidate vectors for the transmission of WNV in the area. The changes in host attractiveness might be related to variable densities of the migratory birds during the trapping period. We discuss the importance of these results on the risk of WNV transmission in horses and humans.
Article 2 Reads 11 Citations African Swine Fever Virus DNA in Soft Ticks, Senegal Laurence Vial, Barbara WIELAND, Ferran Jori, Eric Etter, Lin... Published: 01 December 2007
Emerging Infectious Diseases, doi: 10.3201/eid1312.071022
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African swine fever is a highly contagious disease of pigs in Africa. Although its persistence in Senegal may be caused by asymptomatic carriers involved in the domestic transmission cycle, we demonstrated that the soft tick Ornithodoros sonrai can be naturally infected with the causative agent.
Article 1 Read 20 Citations Risk Analysis and Bovine Tuberculosis, a Re-emerging Zoonosis Eric Etter, PILAR DONADO, Ferran Jori, Alexandre Caron, Flav... Published: 01 October 2006
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, doi: 10.1196/annals.1373.006
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The widespread of immunodeficiency with AIDS, the consequence of poverty on sanitary protection and information at both individual and state levels lead control of tuberculosis (TB) to be one of the priorities of World Health Organization programs. The impact of bovine tuberculosis (BTB) on humans is poorly documented. However, BTB remains a major problem for livestock in developing countries particularly in Africa and wildlife is responsible for the failure of TB eradication programs. In Africa, the consumption of raw milk and raw meat, and the development of bushmeat consumption as a cheap source of proteins, represent one of the principal routes for human contaminations with BTB. The exploration of these different pathways using tools as participatory epidemiology allows the risk analysis of the impact of BTB on human health in Africa. This analysis represents a management support and decision tool in the study and the control of zoonotic BTB.
Article 1 Read 5 Citations The effect of two levels of dietary protein on resistance and resilience of dairy goats experimentally infected with Tri... Eric Etter, Herv� Hoste, Christophe Chartier, Isabelle Pors,... Published: 01 March 2000
Veterinary Research, doi: 10.1051/vetres:2000120
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Numerous studies have examined the interactions between protein nutrition and the response to nematode parasitism in sheep, but very few in goats. Compared with other ruminants, goats are less resistant to nematode infection. In addition, in dairy goats, high producing animals have been shown to be less resistant and less resilient to infection compared to low producing ones. The objective of the present study was to examine the consequences of protein supplementation on both resistance and resilience of dairy goats to nematode trickle infection, taking into account the initial level of milk production of the animals. During a 14-week period, 40 milking goats received a high protein (HP) diet supplying 130% of the protein requirements, and 38 goats were fed a intermediate protein (IP) diet (120% of the protein requirements). In addition, half of each group was given a weekly trickle infection with Trichostrongylus colubriformis larvae, the other part of the flock remained non-infected. Faecal egg counts (FEC), eosinophil counts and pathophysiological data (urea, albumin and inorganic phosphate concentrations in the serum) were measured twice a month. Milk production data (milk yield, protein and fat contents) were also recorded every 15 days. The results showed that FECs were lower (p < 0.05) and eosinophil counts higher (p < 0.05) in the animals receiving the HP diet suggesting that resistance was enhanced by protein supplementation. Meanwhile, milk parameters (related to resilience) were not affected by the level of protein in the diet when considering the whole groups. In contrast, in the high producing goats, the milk production and milk composition parameters were improved with the HP diet. To conclude, we have seen that the expression of both resistance and resilience did not appear when the coverage of the protein requirements was insufficient. Because the milk production is dependent on the protein supply, we suggest that there is a competition in the use of the protein between the development of resistance and the milk production.