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Dina Dobraca  - - - 
Top co-authors See all
Sumi Hoshiko

7 shared publications

Environmental Health Investigations Branch, California Department of Public Health (CDPH), Richmond, CA 94804, USA;(M.P.);(D.S.);(M.K.)

Rebecca Jackson

4 shared publications

Occupational Health Branch, California Department of Public Health, Richmond, CA 94804, USA;(R.J.);(S.S.)

Martha Harnly

2 shared publications

Environmental Health Investigations Branch, California Department of Public Health, Richmond, CA 94804, USA;(S.H.);(D.D.);(D.S.);(M.H.)

Svetlana Smorodinsky

2 shared publications

Occupational Health Branch, California Department of Public Health, Richmond, CA 94804, USA;(R.J.);(S.S.)

Daniel Smith

1 shared publications

Environmental Health Investigations Branch, California Department of Public Health, Richmond, CA 94804, USA;(S.H.);(D.D.);(D.S.);(M.H.)

8
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Distribution of Articles published per year 
(2006 - 2018)
Total number of journals
published in
 
7
 
Publications See all
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Urinary biomarkers of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in pre- and peri-pubertal girls in Northern California: Predictor... Dina Dobraca, Raymond Lum, Andreas Sjödin, Antonia M. Calafa... Published: 01 August 2018
Environmental Research, doi: 10.1016/j.envres.2017.11.011
DOI See at publisher website ABS Show/hide abstract
Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), a class of chemicals produced as combustion by-products, have been associated with endocrine disruption. To understand exposure in children, who have been less studied than adults, we examined PAH metabolite concentrations by demographic characteristics, potential sources of exposure, and variability over time, in a cohort study of pre- and peri-pubertal girls in Northern California. Urinary concentrations of ten PAH metabolites and cotinine were quantified in 431 girls age 6–8 years at baseline. Characteristics obtained from parental interview, physical exam, and linked traffic data were examined as predictors of PAH metabolite concentrations using multivariable linear regression. A subset of girls (n = 100) had repeat measures of PAH metabolites in the second and fourth years of the study. We calculated the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), Spearman correlation coefficients, and how well the quartile ranking by a single measurement represented the four-year average PAH biomarker concentration. Eight PAH metabolites were detected in ≥ 95% of the girls. The most consistent predictors of PAH biomarker concentrations were cotinine concentration, grilled food consumption, and region of residence, with some variation by demographics and season. After adjustment, select PAH metabolite concentrations were higher for Hispanic and Asian girls, and lower among black girls; 2-naphthol concentrations were higher in girls from lower income households. Other than 1-naphthol, there was modest reproducibility over time (ICCs between 0.18 and 0.49) and the concentration from a single spot sample was able to reliably rank exposure into quartiles consistent with the multi-year average. These results confirm diet and environmental tobacco smoke exposure as the main sources of PAHs. Controlling for these sources, differences in concentrations still existed by race for specific PAH metabolites and by income for 2-naphthol. The modest temporal variability implies adequate exposure assignment using concentrations from a single sample to define a multi-year exposure timeframe for epidemiologic exposure-response studies.
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Age at Pubertal Onset in Girls and Tobacco Smoke Exposure during Pre- and Post-natal Susceptibility Windows Gayle C. Windham, Raymond Lum, Robert Voss, Mary Wolff, Susa... Published: 01 September 2017
Epidemiology, doi: 10.1097/EDE.0000000000000704
DOI See at publisher website PubMed View at PubMed ABS Show/hide abstract
Tobacco smoke contains known hormonally active chemicals and reproductive toxicants. Several studies have examined prenatal maternal smoking and offspring age at menarche, but few examined earlier pubertal markers, nor accounted for exposure during childhood. Our objective was to examine pre- and post-natal smoke exposure in relation to timing of early pubertal events. An ethnically diverse cohort of 1239 girls was enrolled at age 6–8 years for a longitudinal study of puberty at three U.S. sites. Girls participated in annual or semi-annual exams to measure anthropometry and Tanner breast and pubic hair stages. Prenatal and current tobacco smoke exposures, as well as covariates, were obtained from parent questionnaire. Cotinine was measured in urine collected at enrollment. Using accelerated failure time models, we calculated adjusted time ratios for age at pubertal onset (maturation stages 2 or higher) and smoke exposure. Girls with higher prenatal (≥5 cigarettes/day) or secondhand smoke exposure had earlier pubic hair development than unexposed (adjusted time ratio = 0.92 (95% CI 0.87–0.97) and 0.94 (95% CI 0.90–0.97), respectively). Including both exposures in the same model yielded similar associations. Higher urinary cotinine quartiles were associated with younger age at breast and pubic hair onset in unadjusted models, but not after adjustment. Greater prenatal and childhood secondhand smoke exposure were associated with earlier onset of pubic hair, but not breast, development. These exposures represent modifiable risk factors for early pubertal development that should be considered for addition to the extensive list of adverse effects from tobacco smoke.
Article 0 Reads 2 Citations Environmental Chemicals in an Urban Population of Pregnant Women and Their Newborns from San Francisco Lara J. Cushing, Bill M. Jesdale, Jackie M. Schwartz, Weihon... Published: 26 October 2016
Environmental Science & Technology, doi: 10.1021/acs.est.6b03492
DOI See at publisher website
Article 0 Reads 6 Citations Mortality during a Large-Scale Heat Wave by Place, Demographic Group, Internal and External Causes of Death, and Buildin... Lauren Joe, Sumi Hoshiko, Dina Dobraca, Rebecca Jackson, Sve... Published: 09 March 2016
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, doi: 10.3390/ijerph13030299
DOI See at publisher website PubMed View at PubMed ABS Show/hide abstract
Mortality increases during periods of elevated heat. Identification of vulnerable subgroups by demographics, causes of death, and geographic regions, including deaths occurring at home, is needed to inform public health prevention efforts. We calculated mortality relative risks (RRs) and excess deaths associated with a large-scale California heat wave in 2006, comparing deaths during the heat wave with reference days. For total (all-place) and at-home mortality, we examined risks by demographic factors, internal and external causes of death, and building climate zones. During the heat wave, 582 excess deaths occurred, a 5% increase over expected (RR = 1.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03–1.08). Sixty-six percent of excess deaths were at home (RR = 1.12, CI 1.07–1.16). Total mortality risk was higher among those aged 35–44 years than ≥65, and among Hispanics than whites. Deaths from external causes increased more sharply (RR = 1.18, CI 1.10–1.27) than from internal causes (RR = 1.04, CI 1.02–1.07). Geographically, risk varied by building climate zone; the highest risks of at-home death occurred in the northernmost coastal zone (RR = 1.58, CI 1.01–2.48) and the southernmost zone of California’s Central Valley (RR = 1.43, CI 1.21–1.68). Heat wave mortality risk varied across subpopulations, and some patterns of vulnerability differed from those previously identified. Public health efforts should also address at-home mortality, non-elderly adults, external causes, and at-risk geographic regions.
Article 0 Reads 10 Citations Biomonitoring in California Firefighters Dina Dobraca, Leslie Israel, Sandra McNeel, Robert Voss, Mia... Published: 06 January 2015
Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, doi: 10.1097/JOM.0000000000000307
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To assess California firefighters' blood concentrations of selected chemicals and compare with a representative US population. We report laboratory methods and analytic results for cadmium, lead, mercury, and manganese in whole blood and 12 serum perfluorinated chemicals in a sample of 101 Southern California firefighters. Firefighters' blood metal concentrations were all similar to or lower than the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) values, except for six participants whose mercury concentrations (range: 9.79 to 13.42 μg/L) were close to or higher than the NHANES reporting threshold of 10 μg/L. Perfluorodecanoic acid concentrations were elevated compared with NHANES and other firefighter studies. Perfluorodecanoic acid concentrations were three times higher in this firefighter group than in NHANES adult males. Firefighters may have unidentified sources of occupational exposure to perfluorinated chemicals.
Article 0 Reads 10 Citations Elevated mercury levels in pregnant woman linked to skin cream from Mexico Carrie A. Dickenson, Tracey J. Woodruff, Naomi E. Stotland, ... Published: 01 August 2013
American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, doi: 10.1016/j.ajog.2013.05.030
DOI See at publisher website PubMed View at PubMed
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