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Peter Rudnai  - - - 
Top co-authors See all
Mia Hashibe

626 shared publications

Huntsman Cancer Institute, 2000 Circle of Hope Drive, Salt Lake City, UT 84103, United States of America

Keitaro Matsuo

485 shared publications

Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya

Renato Talamini

307 shared publications

Unit of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, National Cancer Institute, Aviano, Italy

Andrew F. Olshan

304 shared publications

Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, USA

Wolfgang Ahrens

284 shared publications

Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology—BIPS, Bremen, Germany

153
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Publication Record
Distribution of Articles published per year 
(2004 - 2018)
Total number of journals
published in
 
27
 
Publications See all
PREPRINT-CONTENT 0 Reads 0 Citations Telomere length, arsenic exposure and risk of basal cell carcinoma of skin: Nalini Srinivas, Sivaramakrishna Rachakonda, Thomas Hielsche... Published: 08 November 2018
bioRxiv, doi: 10.1101/465732
DOI See at publisher website
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Corrigendum re “Genetic Variants Related to Longer Telomere Length are Associated with Increased Risk of Renal Cell Carc... Mitchell J. Machiela, Jonathan N. Hofmann, Robert Carreras-T... Published: 01 September 2018
European Urology, doi: 10.1016/j.eururo.2018.05.017
DOI See at publisher website
Article 0 Reads 2 Citations Lung cancer and socioeconomic status in a pooled analysis of case-control studies Jan Hovanec, Jack Siemiatycki, David I. Conway, Ann Olsson, ... Published: 20 February 2018
PLOS ONE, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0192999
DOI See at publisher website ABS Show/hide abstract
An association between low socioeconomic status (SES) and lung cancer has been observed in several studies, but often without adequate control for smoking behavior. We studied the association between lung cancer and occupationally derived SES, using data from the international pooled SYNERGY study. Twelve case-control studies from Europe and Canada were included in the analysis. Based on occupational histories of study participants we measured SES using the International Socio-Economic Index of Occupational Status (ISEI) and the European Socio-economic Classification (ESeC). We divided the ISEI range into categories, using various criteria. Stratifying by gender, we calculated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) by unconditional logistic regression, adjusting for age, study, and smoking behavior. We conducted analyses by histological subtypes of lung cancer and subgroup analyses by study region, birth cohort, education and occupational exposure to known lung carcinogens. The analysis dataset included 17,021 cases and 20,885 controls. There was a strong elevated OR between lung cancer and low SES, which was attenuated substantially after adjustment for smoking, however a social gradient persisted. SES differences in lung cancer risk were higher among men (lowest vs. highest SES category: ISEI OR 1.84 (95% CI 1.61–2.09); ESeC OR 1.53 (95% CI 1.44–1.63)), than among women (lowest vs. highest SES category: ISEI OR 1.54 (95% CI 1.20–1.98); ESeC OR 1.34 (95% CI 1.19–1.52)). SES remained a risk factor for lung cancer after adjustment for smoking behavior.
Article 0 Reads 1 Citation No association between global DNA methylation in peripheral blood and lung cancer risk in nonsmoking women Ann Davis, Meng-Hua Tao, Jia Chen, Ghislaine Scelo, Vladimir... Published: 01 January 2018
European Journal of Cancer Prevention, doi: 10.1097/cej.0000000000000244
DOI See at publisher website PubMed View at PubMed
Article 0 Reads 5 Citations Genetic Variants Related to Longer Telomere Length are Associated with Increased Risk of Renal Cell Carcinoma Mitchell J. Machiela, Jonathan N. Hofmann, Robert Carreras-T... Published: 01 November 2017
European Urology, doi: 10.1016/j.eururo.2017.07.015
DOI See at publisher website PubMed View at PubMed
Article 0 Reads 9 Citations Genome-wide association study identifies multiple risk loci for renal cell carcinoma Ghislaine Scelo, Mark P. Purdue, Kevin M. Brown, Mattias Joh... Published: 09 June 2017
Nature Communications, doi: 10.1038/ncomms15724
DOI See at publisher website PubMed View at PubMed ABS Show/hide abstract
Previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified six risk loci for renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We conducted a meta-analysis of two new scans of 5,198 cases and 7,331 controls together with four existing scans, totalling 10,784 cases and 20,406 controls of European ancestry. Twenty-four loci were tested in an additional 3,182 cases and 6,301 controls. We confirm the six known RCC risk loci and identify seven new loci at 1p32.3 (rs4381241, P=3.1 × 10−10), 3p22.1 (rs67311347, P=2.5 × 10−8), 3q26.2 (rs10936602, P=8.8 × 10−9), 8p21.3 (rs2241261, P=5.8 × 10−9), 10q24.33-q25.1 (rs11813268, P=3.9 × 10−8), 11q22.3 (rs74911261, P=2.1 × 10−10) and 14q24.2 (rs4903064, P=2.2 × 10−24). Expression quantitative trait analyses suggest plausible candidate genes at these regions that may contribute to RCC susceptibility.
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