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Robert Savé  - - - 
Top co-authors See all
Josep Maria Espelta

41 shared publications

Autonomous University of Barcelona

Guille Peguero

7 shared publications

Autonomous University of Barcelona

Xavier Aranda

6 shared publications

IRTA-Torre Marimon

Robert Savé

2 shared publications

Institut de Recerca i Tecnología Agroalimentàries (IRTA)

Carme Biel

1 shared publications

IRTA-Torre Marimon

2
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Publication Record
Distribution of Articles published per year 

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2
 
Publications
Article 0 Reads 7 Citations Allelopathic potential of the neotropical dry-forest tree Acacia pennatula Benth.: inhibition of seedling establishment ... Guille Peguero, Oscar R. Lanuza, Robert Savé, Josep Maria Es... Published: 28 December 2011
Plant Ecology, doi: 10.1007/s11258-011-0014-0
DOI See at publisher website
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Secondary succession after land abandonment in tropical dry forests has been suggested to be favoured by the facilitation effects for seedling establishment exerted by pioneer trees isolated in these savannah-like landscapes. However, it has also been noticed that these pioneer species may sometimes have an encroaching effect and arrest succession for several decades. We investigated in this study whether allelopathy can play a role in limiting seedling establishment of co-occurring tree species under the canopy of Acacia pennatula by means of lab bioassays and field experiments in north-west Nicaragua. Leaf extracts of A. pennatula did not affect seed germination but reduced the general growth and especially the development of the root compartment in seedlings, shifting their biomass allocation model to a reduced root/shoot ratio. Survival of planted seedlings under the canopy of A. pennatula was about 20–30% lower than outside, and this reduction was particularly pronounced as the dry season progressed, despite the milder conditions (e.g. higher soil moisture) being experienced in the inner positions under the canopy. Altogether, our results suggest that, rather than facilitating, A. pennatula may inhibit the establishment of seedlings under its canopy probably by means of an allelopathic interference in the development of the root system with critical negative consequences for young seedlings in terms of overcoming the dry season. This article warns about overemphasizing the nucleation effect that remnant and isolated trees may have to facilitate secondary succession in these highly disturbed savannah-like tropical dry forests.
BOOK-CHAPTER 0 Reads 2 Citations Grapevine Roots and Soil Environment: Growth, Distribution and Function Felicidad Herralde, Robert Savé, Xavier Aranda, Carme Biel, ... Published: 01 January 2010
Methodologies and Results in Grapevine Research, doi: 10.1007/978-90-481-9283-0_1
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As for many plants, belowground processes occurring in grapevine are much lesser well known than above ground processes. Root biomass, root distribution, root physiology need further study as well as their responses to the soil environment in relation to the performance of the grapevine (yield and quality). This chapter gives an overview of the methodologies used to study grapevine roots and their environment. First of all, root characteristics and soil environment must be described. Monitoring of soil water status is approached with different methods. Root sampling methods such as direct excavation, soil coring, root profiles, rhizotrons, minirhizotrons, and ingrowth cores are described and some results presented. Finally, ecophysiological measurements such as root biomass and distribution, root composition, hormones, and water uptake in roots are commented.