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Peijun Shi  - - - 
Top co-authors See all
Hongmei Xu

177 shared publications

MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Change and Natural Disaster, Institute of Resources Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China

Yanyan Yang

170 shared publications

A-Xing Zhu

156 shared publications

Chinese Academy of Sciences

Yun Xie

151 shared publications

Zhijun Chen

143 shared publications

108
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Publication Record
Distribution of Articles published per year 
(1970 - 2016)
Total number of journals
published in
 
70
 
Publications See all
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Reply to 'Emission effects of the Chinese-Russian gas deal' Wenjie Dong, Wenping Yuan, Shuguang Liu, John Moore, Peijun ... Published: 01 February 2016
Nature Climate Change, doi: 10.1038/nclimate2851
DOI See at publisher website
Article 0 Reads 2 Citations Farmers’ crop insurance perception and participation decisions: empirical evidence from Hunan, China Tao Ye, Yangbin Liu, Jiwei Wang, Ming Wang, Peijun Shi Published: 08 January 2016
Journal of Risk Research, doi: 10.1080/13669877.2015.1118151
DOI See at publisher website
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The measurement of risk perception and risk attitudes, and their link to actual risk behaviors have been extensively discussed. However, the potential impact of perception of risk management instruments on the decision to use those instruments has rarely been addressed. This article hypothesizes that the degree of perception of insurance contracts and participation decisions could have substantial mutual influence depending on the development of the market. An empirical work is carried out based on a survey of data for paddy rice farmers in Hunan Province, China. It shows that the sampled farmers’ crop insurance perception was surprisingly low despite years of pilot programs and tens of billions of expenditure in government subsidies. The result of simultaneous equations model indicates that crop insurance perception and participation are simultaneously determined and mutually improving. Moreover, empirical evidence indicates that the impact of crop insurance participation on perception is slightly stronger than that of perception on participation, and thus provides weak evidence of a ‘learning-by-doing’ stage in China at present. Together with evidence of substantial local disparities in perception, implications for the Chinese government in further cultivating the crop and rural insurance market are discussed.
BOOK-CHAPTER 0 Reads 0 Citations Snow, Frost, and Hail Disasters in China Jing’ai Wang, Yaojie Yue, Jingtao Zhao, Yuan Bai, Lili Lv, P... Published: 01 January 2016
IHDP/Future Earth-Integrated Risk Governance Project Series, doi: 10.1007/978-3-662-50270-9_7
DOI See at publisher website
BOOK-CHAPTER 0 Reads 0 Citations Landslide and Debris Flow Disasters in China Yongqiu Wu, Xilin Liu, Jing’ai Wang, Peijun Shi Published: 01 January 2016
IHDP/Future Earth-Integrated Risk Governance Project Series, doi: 10.1007/978-3-662-50270-9_3
DOI See at publisher website
BOOK-CHAPTER 0 Reads 1 Citation Droughts in China Tao Ye, Huicong Jia, Yongdeng Lei, Peijun Shi, Jing’ai Wang Published: 01 January 2016
IHDP/Future Earth-Integrated Risk Governance Project Series, doi: 10.1007/978-3-662-50270-9_6
DOI See at publisher website
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Age-dependent forest carbon sink: Estimation via inverse modeling Tao Zhou, Peijun Shi, Gensuo Jia, Yongjiu Dai, Xiang Zhao, W... Published: 01 December 2015
Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences, doi: 10.1002/2015jg002943
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Forests have been recognized to sequester a substantial amount of carbon (C) from the atmosphere. However, considerable uncertainty remains regarding the magnitude and time course of the C sink. Revealing the intrinsic relationship between forest age and C sink is crucial for reducing uncertainties in prediction of forest C sink potential. In this study, we developed a stepwise data assimilation approach to combine a process-based Terrestrial ECOsystem Regional model, observations from multiple sources, and stochastic sampling to inversely estimate carbon cycle parameters including carbon sink at different forest ages for evergreen needle-leaved forests in China. The new approach is effective to estimate age-dependent parameter of maximal light-use efficiency (R2 = 0.99) and, accordingly, can quantify a relationship between forest age and the vegetation and soil C sinks. The estimated ecosystem C sink increases rapidly with age, peaks at 0.451 kg C m−2 yr−1 at age 22 years (ranging from 0.421 to 0.465 kg C m−2 yr−1), and gradually decreases thereafter. The dynamic patterns of C sinks in vegetation and soil are significantly different. C sink in vegetation first increases rapidly with age and then decreases. C sink in soil, however, increases continuously with age; it acts as a C source when the age is less than 20 years, after which it acts as a sink. For the evergreen needle-leaved forest, the highest C sink efficiency (i.e., C sink per unit net primary productivity) is approximately 60%, with age between 11 and 43 years. Overall, the inverse estimation of carbon cycle parameters can make reasonable estimates of age-dependent C sequestration in forests.