Please login first
Lisa M. Avery  - - - 
Top co-authors See all
Ann Louise Heathwaite

125 shared publications

Lancaster University

David M. Oliver

52 shared publications

Biological & Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling, FK9 4LA, UK

Richard S. Quilliam

44 shared publications

Biological and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling, UK

Alistair McVittie

32 shared publications

Scotland’s Rural College (SRUC), Edinburgh, UK

Klaus Glenk

25 shared publications

Land Economy, Environment and Society Group, Scotland’s Rural College (SRUC), Edinburgh, UK

4
Publications
0
Reads
0
Downloads
17
Citations
Publication Record
Distribution of Articles published per year 
(2012 - 2015)
Total number of journals
published in
 
4
 
Publications
Article 0 Reads 1 Citation Molecular tools for bathing water assessment in Europe: Balancing social science research with a rapidly developing envi... David M. Oliver, Nick D. Hanley, Melanie Van Niekerk, David ... Published: 21 September 2015
Ambio, doi: 10.1007/s13280-015-0698-9
DOI See at publisher website PubMed View at PubMed ABS Show/hide abstract
The use of molecular tools, principally qPCR, versus traditional culture-based methods for quantifying microbial parameters (e.g., Fecal Indicator Organisms) in bathing waters generates considerable ongoing debate at the science–policy interface. Advances in science have allowed the development and application of molecular biological methods for rapid (~2 h) quantification of microbial pollution in bathing and recreational waters. In contrast, culture-based methods can take between 18 and 96 h for sample processing. Thus, molecular tools offer an opportunity to provide a more meaningful statement of microbial risk to water-users by providing near-real-time information enabling potentially more informed decision-making with regard to water-based activities. However, complementary studies concerning the potential costs and benefits of adopting rapid methods as a regulatory tool are in short supply. We report on findings from an international Working Group that examined the breadth of social impacts, challenges, and research opportunities associated with the application of molecular tools to bathing water regulations.
Article 0 Reads 6 Citations Environmental risk factors in the incidence of Johne’s disease Geoffrey N. Elliott, Rupert L. Hough, Lisa M. Avery, Charlot... Published: 26 March 2014
Critical Reviews in Microbiology, doi: 10.3109/1040841x.2013.867830
DOI See at publisher website PubMed View at PubMed
Article 0 Reads 4 Citations Prevalence and survival of potential pathogens in source-segregated green waste compost Lisa M. Avery, Philippa Booth, Colin Campbell, David Tompkin... Published: 01 August 2012
Science of The Total Environment, doi: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2012.05.020
DOI See at publisher website PubMed View at PubMed
Article 0 Reads 6 Citations Risk assessment of the use of PAS100 green composts in sheep and cattle production in Scotland Rupert L. Hough, Philippa Booth, Lisa M. Avery, Stewart Rhin... Published: 01 January 2012
Waste Management, doi: 10.1016/j.wasman.2011.08.008
DOI See at publisher website PubMed View at PubMed
Top