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P. G. Brodrick  - - - 
Top co-authors See all
Harvey Enns

1 shared publications

University of Dayton, Department of Management Information Systems, Dayton, OH 45469, USA

Kevin Hallinan

1 shared publications

University of Dayton, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Dayton, OH 45469, USA

Mark Rembert

1 shared publications

Energize Clinton County, 6 N South St., Wilmington, OH 45177, USA

Nathan Lammers

1 shared publications

University of Dayton, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Dayton, OH 45469, USA

Nichole Hanus

1 shared publications

University of Dayton, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Dayton, OH 45469, USA

15
Publications
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102
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Publication Record
Distribution of Articles published per year 
(2012 - 2019)
Total number of journals
published in
 
12
 
Publications See all
Article 0 Reads 1 Citation Forest Drought Resistance at Large Geographic Scales P. G. Brodrick, L. D. L. Anderegg, G. P. Asner Published: 16 March 2019
Geophysical Research Letters, doi: 10.1029/2018gl081108
DOI See at publisher website ABS Show/hide abstract
Forest conservation and carbon sequestration efforts are on the rise, yet the long‐term stability of these efforts under a changing climate remains unknown. We generate nearly three decades of remotely‐sensed canopy water content throughout California, which we use to determine patterns of drought stress. Linking these patterns of drought stress with meteorological variables enables us to quantify spatially explicit biophysical drought resistance in terms of magnitude and duration. These maps reveal significant spatial heterogeneity in drought resistance, and demonstrate that almost all forests have less resistance to severe, persistent droughts. By identifying the spatial patterning of biophysical drought resistance, we quantify an important component of long‐term ecosystem stability that can be used for forest conservation, management, and policy decisions.
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Imaging spectroscopy predicts variable distance decay across contrasting Amazonian tree communities Frederick C. Draper, Christopher Baraloto, Philip G. Brodric... Published: 12 October 2018
Journal of Ecology, doi: 10.1111/1365-2745.13067
DOI See at publisher website
Article 0 Reads 1 Citation Optimal design and operation of integrated solar combined cycles under emissions intensity constraints Philip G. Brodrick, Adam R. Brandt, Louis J. Durlofsky Published: 01 September 2018
Applied Energy, doi: 10.1016/j.apenergy.2018.06.052
DOI See at publisher website
Article 0 Reads 3 Citations Landscape-scale variation in canopy water content of giant sequoias during drought Tarin Paz-Kagan, Nicholas R. Vaughn, Roberta E. Martin, Phil... Published: 01 July 2018
Forest Ecology and Management, doi: 10.1016/j.foreco.2017.11.018
DOI See at publisher website
Article 0 Reads 2 Citations Estimating aboveground carbon density and its uncertainty in Borneo's structurally complex tropical forests using airbor... Tommaso Jucker, Gregory P. Asner, Michele Dalponte, Philip G... Published: 22 June 2018
Biogeosciences, doi: 10.5194/bg-15-3811-2018
DOI See at publisher website ABS Show/hide abstract
Borneo contains some of the world's most biodiverse and carbon-dense tropical forest, but this 750000km2 island has lost 62% of its old-growth forests within the last 40 years. Efforts to protect and restore the remaining forests of Borneo hinge on recognizing the ecosystem services they provide, including their ability to store and sequester carbon. Airborne laser scanning (ALS) is a remote sensing technology that allows forest structural properties to be captured in great detail across vast geographic areas. In recent years ALS has been integrated into statewide assessments of forest carbon in Neotropical and African regions, but not yet in Asia. For this to happen new regional models need to be developed for estimating carbon stocks from ALS in tropical Asia, as the forests of this region are structurally and compositionally distinct from those found elsewhere in the tropics. By combining ALS imagery with data from 173 permanent forest plots spanning the lowland rainforests of Sabah on the island of Borneo, we develop a simple yet general model for estimating forest carbon stocks using ALS-derived canopy height and canopy cover as input metrics. An advanced feature of this new model is the propagation of uncertainty in both ALS- and ground-based data, allowing uncertainty in hectare-scale estimates of carbon stocks to be quantified robustly. We show that the model effectively captures variation in aboveground carbon stocks across extreme disturbance gradients spanning tall dipterocarp forests and heavily logged regions and clearly outperforms existing ALS-based models calibrated for the tropics, as well as currently available satellite-derived products. Our model provides a simple, generalized and effective approach for mapping forest carbon stocks in Borneo and underpins ongoing efforts to safeguard and facilitate the restoration of its unique tropical forests.
Article 0 Reads 3 Citations An Approach for High-Resolution Mapping of Hawaiian Metrosideros Forest Mortality Using Laser-Guided Imaging Spectroscop... Nicholas R. Vaughn, Gregory P. Asner, Philip G. Brodrick, Ro... Published: 22 March 2018
Remote Sensing, doi: 10.3390/rs10040502
DOI See at publisher website ABS Show/hide abstract
Rapid ‘Ōhi‘a Death (ROD) is a disease aggressively killing large numbers of Metrosideros polymorpha (‘ōhi‘a), a native keystone tree species on Hawaii Island. This loss threatens to deeply alter the biological make-up of this unique island ecosystem. Spatially explicit information about the present and past advancement of the disease is essential for its containment; yet, currently such data are severely lacking. To this end, we used the Carnegie Airborne Observatory to collect Laser-Guided Imaging Spectroscopy data and high-resolution digital imagery across >500,000 ha of Hawaii Island in June–July 2017. We then developed a method to map individual tree crowns matching the symptoms of both active (brown; desiccated ‘ōhi‘a crowns) and past (leafless tree crowns) ROD infection using an ensemble of two distinct machine learning approaches. Employing a very conservative classification scheme for minimizing false-positives, model sensitivity rates were 86.9 and 82.5, and precision rates were 97.4 and 95.3 for browning and leafless crowns, respectively. Across the island of Hawaii, we found 43,134 individual crowns suspected of exhibiting the active (browning) stage of ROD infection. Hotspots of potential ROD infection are apparent in the maps. The peninsula on the eastern side of Hawaii known as the Puna district, where the ROD outbreak likely originated, contained a particularly high density of brown crown detections. In comparison, leafless crown detections were much more numerous (547,666 detected leafless crowns in total) and more dispersed across the island. Mapped hotspots of likely ROD incidence across the island will enable scientists, administrators, and land managers to better understand both where and how ROD spreads and how to apply limited resources to limiting this spread.
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