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Universe Webinar | Probing Structure, Morphology and Dynamics of Galaxies

18 Nov 2021, 15:00 (CET)

Galaxies, Structure, Evolution
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Welcome from the Chair

4th Universe Webinar

Probing Structure, Morphology and Dynamics of Galaxies

Welcome to the Webinar "Probing Structure, Morphology and Dynamics of Galaxies". This webinar supports a special edition of the journal Universe, focused on probing the structure, morphology and dynamics of galaxies.

This volume will focus on the formation and evolution of disk galaxies from Local Group galaxies and nearby galaxies to the most distant galaxies in the Universe. The nearest galaxies are critical objects for our understanding of the galaxy picture. Properties of Local Group galaxies such as the Milky Way, M31, M33, and their satellites, their correlations with the bulge and halo components, and the effects of interactions with galaxy satellites are critical in understanding the formation of galaxies.

Star formation in galaxies is a subject in which we can expect dramatic new results from multiwavelength observations from space-based and ground-based observatories (particularly from ALMA). By 2020, we should have constraints on galaxy growth timescales and radial dependence from measured star formation rates.

Studying the structure of galaxy disks is the starting point to address the formation of disk galaxies. Most nearby galaxies are radially truncated in their outskirts. These outer edges could either trace the maximum angular momentum during the galaxy formation epoch or be associated with global star formation thresholds. New insights are expected from the analysis of structural properties of disks at high redshift from ongoing surveys which will unveil how disks evolve over time.

Accretion and merging events are key in the formation of galaxies. Many authors have emphasized that accretion dominates the evolution of small galaxies, but events such as major mergers are more significant for large galaxies. This has been emphasized repeatedly by state-of-the-art galaxy formation simulations, and much progress has been made as simulation resolution is improved and more realistic physics is included.

Secular evolution is a subject that is making progress in observational and theoretical extragalactic astronomy. On the observational side, new results concerning the systematic properties of pseudobulges, such as stellar populations and star formation timescales, are expected in a few years. On the theoretical side, we plan to cover different topics of this active research area, such as the pseudobulge formation out of bars, evolution of bars, and mechanisms responsible for the disk heating process.

I hope to see many of you at the Webinar!

My best regards,

Prof. Dr. Marc S. Seigar

Date: 18 November 2021

Time: 3:00 pm CET | 9:00 am EST | 10:00 pm CST Asia

Webinar ID: 847 4320 6596

Webinar Secretariat: universe.webinar@mdpi.com

Chair

University of Toledo, Toledo, OH, USA

DETAILS
Bio
Marc Seigar is Dean of the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics and a Professor of Astronomy at the University of Toledo. Before arriving in Toledo, he served as a Program Director at the National Science Foundation, Associate Dean of Science and Engineering and Head of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Minnesota Duluth, and before that a Professor of Astrophysics at the University of Arkansas. He holds a PhD in Astrophysics from the Liverpool Astrophysics Research Institute and a BSc in Physics from Imperial College London.

Invited Speakers

School of Physics & Astronomy, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton, UK

DETAILS
Bio
After obtaining his PhD at SISSA and a postdoc at the Ohio State University, Francesco moved to the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics as an Alexander von Humboldt Fellow, and then to the Observatoire de Paris as a Marie Curie Fellow. He is now Professor of Astrophysics at the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Southampton. Francesco is PI of a H2020 Marie Skłodowska-Curie Innovative Training Network (https://www.bid4best.org/), fellow of the Alan Turing Institute, fellow of the Higher Education Academy, fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society, and PI of a large-scale project in medical science with St Thomas' Hospital aimed at optimising blood pressure measurements strategies. Francesco is also leading a massive outreach/public engagement project named Astera (Astera - A Cosmological Visualizer (soton.ac.uk)), an interactive, fully immersive 3D realization of the Universe.

Physics Department, Lancaster University, Bailrigg, Lancaster, UK

DETAILS
Bio
David is an observational extragalactic Astrophysicist. He conducts a wide range of observations of the extragalactic Universe (beyond our galaxy) and uses different large telescopes both on the ground and in space, tracing very high energies like X-rays through to the coldest temperatures traced by infrared and radio. The research he does advances our understanding of how galaxies like our own formed and evolved from the primitive Universe till today, including their sizes, morphologies and dynamics. Some of his most famous discoveries include measuring the decline of the cosmic star-formation history over the last 11 billion years and discovering the brightest distant galaxies. Such discoveries have been extensively covered by the media world-wide (e.g. New York Times, TIME, BBC, CNN) and have also resulted in international hour-long documentaries for the NHK in Japan. He also does a wide range of outreach activities, from talks in schools to workshops and also writing opinion articles.

Webinar Content

On Thursday 18 November 2021, MDPI and the Journal Universe organized the 4th webinar entitled “Probing Structure, Morphology and Dynamics of Galaxies”.

The introduction was held by the Chair of the webinar, Prof. Dr. Marc S. Seigar. He is Dean of the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics and a Professor of Astronomy at the University of Toledo in the United States.

The first speaker to kick off this webinar was Prof. Dr. Francesco Shankar from the School of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Southampton in the United Kingdom. He talked about dissecting the formation of bulges and spheroids with state-of-the-art semi-empirical models. Francesco is leading a massive outreach/public engagement project named Astera (Astera - A Cosmological Visualizer (soton.ac.uk)), an interactive, fully immersive 3D realization of the Universe.

The second and final presentation with the title "The Morphology and Dynamics of Star-Forming Galaxies Across the Last 13 Billion Years" was held by Dr. David Sobral from the Physics Department in Lancaster University in the United Kingdom. The research David does advances our understanding of how galaxies like our own formed and evolved from the primitive Universe till today, including their sizes, morphologies and dynamics.

The presentations were followed by a Q&A and a discussion, moderated by the Chair. The webinar was offered via Zoom and required registration to attend. The full recording can be found here on Sciforum website. In order to stay updated on the next webinars on Universe, be sure to sign up for our newsletter by clicking on “Subscribe” at the top of the page.

Program

Speaker/Presentation

Time in CET

Prof. Dr. Marc S. Seigar

Chair Introduction

3:00 - 3:10 pm

Prof. Dr. Francesco Shankar

Dissecting the Formation of Bulges and Spheroids With State-Of-The-Art Semi-empirical Models

3:10 - 3:30 pm

Q&A

3:30 - 3:40 pm

Dr. David Sobral

The Morphology and Dynamics of Star-Forming Galaxies Across the Last 13 Billion Years

3:40 - 4:00 pm

Q&A

4:00 - 4:10 pm

Closing of Webinar
Prof. Dr. Marc S. Seigar

4:10 - 4:20 pm

Relevant SI

Probing Structure, Morphology and Dynamics of Galaxies
Guest Editor: Prof. Dr. Marc S. Seigar

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2022

Sponsors and Partners

Organizers

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