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Renata Libonati   Dr.  University Educator/Researcher 
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Renata Libonati published an article in February 2019.
Top co-authors See all
Duarte Oom

10 shared publications

Forest Research Centre, School of Agriculture, University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal

Alberto W. Setzer

4 shared publications

Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, Centro de Previsão de Tempo e Estudos Climáticos, São José dos Campos, São Paulo, Brazil

Fabiano Morelli

4 shared publications

Centro de Previsão do Tempo e Estudos Climáticos, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, 12227-010 São José dos Campos, Brazil;;; These authors equally contributed to this work

Allan A. Pereira

1 shared publications

Centro de Estudos Florestais, Instituto Superior de Agronomia, Universidade de Lisboa, 1349-017 Lisboa, Portugal;;; These authors equally contributed to this work

Arturo E. Melchiori

1 shared publications

24
Publications
27
Reads
8
Downloads
97
Citations
Publication Record
Distribution of Articles published per year 
(2008 - 2019)
Total number of journals
published in
 
15
 
Publications See all
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Characterizing the atmospheric conditions during the 2010 heatwave in Rio de Janeiro marked by excessive mortality rates João L. Geirinhas, Ricardo M. Trigo, Renata Libonati, Lucas ... Published: 01 February 2019
Science of The Total Environment, doi: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.09.060
DOI See at publisher website
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Droughts Over Amazonia in 2005, 2010, and 2015: A Cloud Cover Perspective Juan C. Jimenez, Renata Libonati, Leonardo F. Peres Published: 11 December 2018
Frontiers in Earth Science, doi: 10.3389/feart.2018.00227
DOI See at publisher website ABS Show/hide abstract
Amazon forests experienced recent severe droughts in an anomalous short period induced by different mechanisms and had different length periods and spatial patterns. Droughts of 2005 and 2010 were attributed to anomalous Sea Surface Temperature (SST) over the Tropical North Atlantic (TNA) during the dry season, but the 2010 drought was more severe and remained for a longer period because it was also induced in late 2009 by a moderate to strong El Niño (EN). Drought in 2015 led to unprecedented warming and extreme soil moisture deficits over some regions, and it was attributed to a very strong EN. Several studies analyzed these drought events regarding different climatic factors such as anomalies in SST, vegetation, temperature, precipitation, soil moisture deficits, solar radiation, etc. However, we have not identified a complete analysis of total cloud cover (TCC) over Amazonia during these drought events in the context of long-term trends and past strong EN events. This brief report aims to present a preliminary analysis of anomalies in TCC over Amazon using reanalysis data with a focus on the last recent drought events into a long-term context. Results show a significant decreasing trend (p < 0.05) for TCC over southern Amazonia during the dry season (around −2% per decade), in contrast to the significant increasing trend found over northern Amazonia during this season and the significant widespread increasing trend during the wet season (between +2 and +4% per decade). Correlation analysis between SST and TCC anomalies is also indicative of the different West-East and North-South patterns linked to EN events or drought episodes driven by TNA warm anomalies.
Article 0 Reads 1 Citation Extreme Drought Events over the Amazon Basin: The Perspective from the Reconstruction of South American Hydroclimate Beatriz Nunes Garcia, Renata Libonati, Ana M. B. Nunes Published: 07 November 2018
Water, doi: 10.3390/w10111594
DOI See at publisher website ABS Show/hide abstract
The Amazon basin has experienced severe drought events for centuries, mainly associated with climate variability connected to tropical North Atlantic and Pacific sea surface temperature anomalous warming. Recently, these events are becoming more frequent, more intense and widespread. Because of the Amazon droughts environmental and socioeconomic impacts, there is an increased demand for understanding the characteristics of such extreme events in the region. In that regard, regional models instead of the general circulation models provide a promising strategy to generate more detailed climate information of extreme events, seeking better representation of physical processes. Due to uneven spatial distribution and gaps found in station data in tropical South America, and the need of more refined climate assessment in those regions, satellite-enhanced regional downscaling for applied studies (SRDAS) is used in the reconstruction of South American hydroclimate, with hourly to monthly outputs from January 1998. Accordingly, this research focuses on the analyses of recent extreme drought events in the years of 2005 and 2010 in the Amazon Basin, using the SRDAS monthly means of near-surface temperature and relative humidity, precipitation and vertically integrated soil moisture fields. Results from this analysis corroborate spatial and temporal patterns found in previous studies on extreme drought events in the region, displaying the distinctive features of the 2005 and 2010 drought events.
Article 0 Reads 1 Citation Burned Area Mapping in the Brazilian Savanna Using a One-Class Support Vector Machine Trained by Active Fires Allan A. Pereira, José Pereira, Renata Libonati, Duarte Oom,... Published: 14 November 2017
Remote Sensing, doi: 10.3390/rs9111161
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We used the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) active fire data (375 m spatial resolution) to automatically extract multispectral samples and train a One-Class Support Vector Machine for burned area mapping, and applied the resulting classification algorithm to 300-m spatial resolution imagery from the Project for On-Board Autonomy-Vegetation (PROBA-V). The active fire data were screened to prevent extraction of unrepresentative burned area samples and combined with surface reflectance bi-weekly composites to produce burned area maps. The procedure was applied over the Brazilian Cerrado savanna, validated with reference maps obtained from Landsat images and compared with the Collection 6 Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) Burned Area product (MCD64A1) Results show that the algorithm developed improved the detection of small-sized scars and displayed results more similar to the reference data than MCD64A1. Unlike active fire-based region growing algorithms, the proposed approach allows for the detection and mapping of burn scars without active fires, thus eliminating a potential source of omission error. The burned area mapping approach presented here should facilitate the development of operational-automated burned area algorithms, and is very straightforward for implementation with other sensors.
CONFERENCE-ARTICLE 24 Reads 1 Citation <strong>Extreme drought events over Amazon basin: the perspective from regional reconstruction of South American hydrocl... Beatriz Garcia, Renata Libonati, Ana Nunes Published: 11 November 2017
First International Electronic Conference on the Hydrological Cycle, doi: 10.3390/CHyCle-2017-04885
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In less than two decades large areas of the Amazon Basin have experienced severe droughts, namely during 1998, 2005, 2010 and 2015. Due to their several social, economic and environmental impacts there is an increased demand in understanding the behavior of such extreme events in the region. In that regard, regional models instead of the general circulation models provide a promising strategy to generate more detailed climate information of extreme events, seeking better representation of physical processes. In such context, the Satellite-enhanced Regional Downscaling for Applied Studies (SRDAS) product has been used in the analysis of South American hydroclimate, with hourly to monthly outputs from January 1998 to near present. Accordingly, this research focuses on the analyses of recent extreme drought events in the years of 2005 and 2010 in the Amazon Basin, using the SRDAS monthly means of near-surface temperature and relative humidity, precipitation and four-level integrated soil moisture fields. Results from this analysis corroborate spatial and temporal patterns found in previous studies on extreme drought events in the region, displaying the distinctive features of the 2005 and 2010 drought events.

Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Climatic and synoptic characterization of heat waves in Brazil João L. Geirinhas, Ricardo M. Trigo, Renata Libonati, Caio A... Published: 19 September 2017
International Journal of Climatology, doi: 10.1002/joc.5294
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