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Valeria De Laurentiis   Ms.  Graduate Student or Post Graduate 
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Valeria De Laurentiis published an article in March 2018.
Top co-authors
Christopher D.F. Rogers

66 shared publications

Civil Engineering/College of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK

Christopher Rogers

43 shared publications

Stanford Univ. (United States)

Dexter V.L. Hunt

11 shared publications

University of Birmingham; United Kingdom

Valeria De Laurentiis

4 shared publications

Civil Engineering/College of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK

4
Publications
20
Reads
0
Downloads
9
Citations
Publication Record
Distribution of Articles published per year 
(2014 - 2018)
Total number of journals
published in
 
4
 
Publications
Article 8 Reads 0 Citations EATS: a life cycle-based decision support tool for local authorities and school caterers Valeria De Laurentiis, Dexter V. L. Hunt, Susan E. Lee, Chri... Published: 16 March 2018
The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, doi: 10.1007/s11367-018-1460-x
DOI See at publisher website ABS Show/hide abstract
This paper describes the research that underpins the development of EATS (the Environmental Assessment Tool for School meals), a life cycle-based decision support tool for local authorities and their contractors responsible for providing catering services to schools. The purpose of this tool is to quantify the carbon footprint (CF) and water footprint (WF) of the meals served in order to identify hotspot meals and ingredients, and suggest simple, yet transformative, reduction measures. A case study is used to test the tool, comparing the impacts of 34 school meal recipes. The tool utilises secondary data to calculate values of CF and WF for a school meal from cradle to plate. This includes three phases: (1) food production, (2) transport of each ingredient to a generic school kitchen in the UK, and (3) meal preparation. Considerations for waste along the supply chain are included. After testing the tool against a set of nutritionally compliant meals, a sensitivity analysis was performed to investigate the influence of the origin and seasonality of the ingredients, transport mode and cooking appliances used on the final results. The results of the case study show the predominance of the production phase in the overall carbon footprint and that there is a strong tendency towards lower impacts for meat-free meals; however, this is not always the case, for instance some of the chicken-based meals present lower impacts than vegetarian meals rich in dairy ingredients. The sensitivity analysis performed on one of the meals shows that the highest value of CF is obtained when the horticultural products are out of season and produced in heated greenhouses, whilst the highest value of WF is obtained when the origin of the ingredients is unknown and the global average values of WF are used in the analysis; this defines a crucial data need if accurate analyses are to be uniformly possible. This article focuses on the potential offered by the public food sector for a transformative reduction in the environmental impact of urban food consumption. The results presented prove that careful menu planning and procurement choices can considerably reduce the overall environmental impact of the service provided without compromising quality or variety. This research thus supports those responsible for making these decisions via a user-friendly tool based on robust scientific evidence.
Article 3 Reads 0 Citations Contribution of school meals to climate change and water use in England Valeria De Laurentiis, Dexter V.L. Hunt, Christopher D.F. Ro... Published: 01 September 2017
Energy Procedia, doi: 10.1016/j.egypro.2017.07.241
DOI See at publisher website
Article 4 Reads 9 Citations Overcoming Food Security Challenges within an Energy/Water/Food Nexus (EWFN) Approach Dexter V.L. Hunt, Christopher D.F. Rogers, Valeria De Lauren... Published: 21 January 2016
Sustainability, doi: 10.3390/su8010095
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The challenge of feeding nine billion people by 2050, in a context of constrained resources and growing environmental pressures posed by current food production methods on one side, and changing lifestyles and consequent shifts in dietary patterns on the other, exacerbated by the effects of climate change, has been defined as one of the biggest challenges of the 21st century. The first step to achieve food security is to find a balance between the growing demand for food, and the limited production capacity. In order to do this three main pathways have been identified: employing sustainable production methods in agriculture, changing diets, and reducing waste in all stages of the food chain. The application of an energy, water and food nexus (EWFN) approach, which takes into account the interactions and connections between these three resources, and the synergies and trade-offs that arise from the way they are managed, is a prerequisite for the correct application of these pathways. This work discusses how Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) might be applicable for creating the evidence-base to foster such desired shifts in food production and consumption patterns.
CONFERENCE-ARTICLE 5 Reads 0 Citations Food Security Challenges: Influences of an Energy/Water/Food Nexus Valeria De Laurentiis, Dexter Hunt, Christopher Rogers Published: 31 October 2014
The 4th World Sustainability Forum, doi: 10.3390/wsf-4-g003
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The food/water/energy nexus is the study of the interactions and connections between these three resources, the synergies and tradeoffs that arise from the way they are managed, and the potential areas of conflict. The core of nexus thinking is that no good results can be achieved from considering these resources independently, which means that food security cannot be achieved in a context of either/both water or/and energy insecurity. All three elements have to be assured to foster sustainability, resilience, prosperity and peace. In this paper attention is focused on the challenges posed by this nexus on achieving food security, which is embodied in the first Millennium Development Goal (MDG), which seeks to halve the number of hungry people in the world between 1990 and 2015. The primary aim of the paper is to identify how the nexus mentality underlies most of the pathways that have been proposed to achieve this goal. It argues that significant shortfalls exist and need to be addressed: there is still no generally accepted definition, and identifiable metrics for assessing the extent to which a food system fosters food security are lacking. Such metrics are necessary when evaluating alternative strategies and negotiating trade-offs therein.
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