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Henry Jordaan     University Educator/Researcher 
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Henry Jordaan published an article in August 2018.
Top co-authors See all
Bennie Grové

29 shared publications

Department of Agricultural Economics, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa

E. Owusu-Sekyere

12 shared publications

Department of Agricultural Economics, University of the Free State, Posbus 339, Bloemfontein 9300, South Africa

Abiodun Akintunde Ogundeji

11 shared publications

Department of Agricultural Economics, University of the Free State, P.O. Box/Posbus 339, Bloemfontein 9300, South Africa

Nicolette Matthews

6 shared publications

Department of Agricultural Economics; University of the Free State; Bloemfontein South Africa

Frikkie Maré

4 shared publications

Department of Agricultural Economics, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa

13
Publications
25
Reads
0
Downloads
20
Citations
Publication Record
Distribution of Articles published per year 
(2010 - 2018)
Total number of journals
published in
 
7
 
Publications See all
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Water Footprint Accounting Along the Wheat-Bread Value Chain: Implications for Sustainable and Productive Water Use Benc... Pascalina Matohlang Mohlotsane, Enoch Owusu-Sekyere, Henry J... Published: 31 August 2018
Water, doi: 10.3390/w10091167
DOI See at publisher website ABS Show/hide abstract
Efficient and wise management of freshwater resources in South Africa has become critical because of the alarming freshwater scarceness. The situation requires a thorough examination of how water is utilized across various departments that use water. This paper reports on an examination of the water footprint and economic water productivities of the wheat-bread value chain. The assessment methodology of the Water Footprint Network was employed. The findings reveal that 954.07 m3 and 1026.07 m3 of water are utilized in the production of a ton of wheat flour in Bainsvlei and Clovelly in South Africa. The average water footprint for wheat bread was 954.53 m3 per ton in Bainsvlei and 1026.53 m3 per ton in Clovelly. More than 99% of the water is used in producing the grain at the farm level. The processing stage of the value chain uses less than 1% of the total water footprint. About 80% of all the water utilised along the wheat bread value chain is attributed to blue water. The findings revealed a significant shift from green water consumption to higher blue water use, and this is a major concern for water users and stakeholders along the wheat-bread value chain, given that blue water is becoming scarce in South Africa. The groundwater contributes about 34% and 42% of the average total water footprint of wheat at the farm level in Clovelly and Bainsvlei, respectively, suggesting the need to have an idea of the contribution of groundwater in water footprint evaluation and water management decision of farmers. This insight will aid in minimizing irrigation water use and pressure on groundwater resources. A total of ZAR 4.27 is obtained for every m3 of water utilized along the wheat-bread value chain. Water footprint assessment has moved away from sole indicator assessment, as a deeper awareness of and insight into the productive use of water at different stages has become vital for policy. To make a correct judgment and to assess the efficient and wise use of water, there is a need for catchment- or region-specific water footprint benchmarks, given that water footprint estimates and economic water productivities vary from one geographical area to another.
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations The influence of animal traits on feedlot profitability of Santa Gertrudis cattle in South Africa W. A. Lombard, F. A. Maré, H. Jordaan Published: 19 June 2018
Agrekon, doi: 10.1080/03031853.2018.1477606
DOI See at publisher website
Article 4 Reads 0 Citations Economics of climate change adaptation: a case study of Ceres – South Africa Abiodun Akintunde Ogundeji, Henry Jordaan, Jan Groenewald Published: 04 April 2017
Climate and Development, doi: 10.1080/17565529.2017.1301866
DOI See at publisher website
Article 4 Reads 3 Citations Economic Water Productivities Along the Dairy Value Chain in South Africa: Implications for Sustainable and Economically... Enoch Owusu-Sekyere, Morné Erwin Scheepers, Henry Jordaan Published: 01 April 2017
Ecological Economics, doi: 10.1016/j.ecolecon.2016.12.020
DOI See at publisher website
Article 5 Reads 3 Citations Water Footprint of Milk Produced and Processed in South Africa: Implications for Policy-Makers and Stakeholders along th... Enoch Owusu-Sekyere, Morné Erwin Scheepers, Henry Jordaan Published: 29 July 2016
Water, doi: 10.3390/w8080322
DOI See at publisher website ABS Show/hide abstract
The current water scarcity situation in South Africa is a threat to sustainable development. The present paper has assessed the water footprint of milk produced and processed in South Africa using the procedures outlined in the water footprint assessment manual. The results show that 1352 m3 of water is required to produce one tonne of milk with 4% fat and 3.3% protein in South Africa. The water used in producing feed for lactating cows alone accounts for 86.35% of the total water footprint of milk. The water footprint of feed ration for lactating cows is about 85% higher than that of non-lactating cows. Green water footprint accounts for more than 86% of the total water footprint of feed ration for lactating cows. Green and blue water footprints are the highest contributors to the total water footprint milk production in South Africa. Water used for feed production for both lactating and non-lactating cows accounts for about 99% of the total water footprint of milk production in South Africa. Particular attention should be given to feed crops with low water footprints and high contribution to dry matter to provide balanced ration with low water footprint. Water users, managers and livestock producers should pay attention to green and blue water consumption activities along the milk value chain and design strategies to minimize them. Corn, sorghum and lucerne production under irrigation in the greater Orange River basin is sustainable, whereas oats production for silage in the same catchment area is not sustainable. Our findings provide the rationale for dairy producers and water users in the dairy industry to get an understanding of the degree of sustainability of their input and output combinations, production choices, and policy interventions, in terms of water use.
Article 4 Reads 4 Citations Determinants of Financial Sustainability for Farm Credit Applications—A Delphi Study Johannes I. F. Henning, Henry Jordaan Published: 14 January 2016
Sustainability, doi: 10.3390/su8010077
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Farmers use credit from commercial credit providers to finance production activities. Commercial credit providers have to predict the financial sustainability of the enterprise to ensure that the borrower will have the ability to repay the loan. A Delphi study was conducted to explore what factors are used as indicators of loan-repayment ability of farmers. The objective was not only to identify factors that are currently considered, but also to identify other personal attributes that may improve the accuracy in predicting the repayment ability of potential borrowers. The Delphi was applied to a panel consisting of nine credit analysts and credit managers from a commercial credit provider in South Africa. The results indicate that the current and past financial performance, account standing, collateral, and credit record of the farm are very important in the assessment of applications in terms of financial performance. Experience and the success factors compared to competitors were found to be important, while age and education/qualification are regarded as less important in predicting repayment ability. The results also show that, although not currently objectively included in credit evaluations, credit analysis regards leadership and human relations; commitment and confidence; internal locus of control; self-efficacy; calculated risk taking; need for achievement; and opportunity seeking as important indicators of the ability of potential borrows to repay their loans. Thus, credit analysts and managers also regard management abilities and entrepreneurial characteristics of potential borrowers to be good indicators of repayment ability. Results from this research provide new indicator factors that can be used to extend existing credit evaluation instruments in order to more accurately predict repayment ability.
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