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Santiago Beguería  - - - 
Top co-authors
Manuel Seeger

96 shared publications

Ana Navas

45 shared publications

Estación Experimental de Aula Dei, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (EEAD-CSIC), 1005 Avda. Montañana, Zaragoza, Spain

José M. García-Ruiz

24 shared publications

Instituto Pirenaico de Ecología

Noemí Lana-Renault

24 shared publications

CSIC

Laura Quijano

12 shared publications

Estación Experimental de Aula Dei, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (EEAD-CSIC), 1005 Avda. Montañana, Zaragoza, Spain

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Distribution of Articles published per year 
(2003 - 2016)
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9
 
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Article 0 Reads 2 Citations Estimating erosion rates using 137Cs measurements and WATEM/SEDEM in a Mediterranean cultivated field Laura Quijano, Santiago Beguería, Leticia Gaspar, Ana Navas Published: 01 March 2016
CATENA, doi: 10.1016/j.catena.2015.11.009
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Highlights•Similar soil redistribution patterns obtained by 137Cs and WATEM/SEDEM•Water erosion dominates soil redistribution over tillage erosion for the study period.•Spatially 137Cs redistribution rates are useful to calibrate WATEM/SEDEM.•Water erosion affects the distribution and export of soil fine components.•Topographic changes by human activity are not well captured by WATEM/SEDEM. ABSTRACTThe loss of fertile topsoil is one of the principal soil degradation problems in agricultural landscapes worldwide. Mediterranean agroecosystems are particularly threatened to soil degradation because of the climate, a higher sensitivity to soil erosion and the intensification of human activities and agricultural practices during centuries. The severity of this problem and the expected increasing risk of soil erosion in Mediterranean cultivated landscapes as a consequence of climate change have generated a demand for estimations of soil redistribution rates and soil loss monitoring.In this study, a representative cultivated field of mountain Mediterranean agroecosystems was selected to estimate 137Cs derived soil redistribution rates using a 137Cs mass balance model. Besides numeric simulation was performed using the WATEM/SEDEM model to estimate spatially-distributed soil redistribution rates. A detailed topographic survey was done to obtain a high-resolution digital elevation model (2.5 m) of the study field and 137Cs derived soil redistribution rates were used to calibrate the model. In the study field, soil erosion predominated over soil deposition. Mean values of 137Cs derived soil erosion and deposition rates were 19.7 Mg ha− 1 yr− 1 and 12.6 Mg ha− 1 yr− 1, respectively. Water erosion was the predominant process of soil redistribution whereas tillage erosion was not significant. The rates obtained with WATEM/SEDEM model were lower; mean erosion was 3.9 Mg ha− 1 yr− 1 and mean deposition rates that occurred in 35% of the grid cells was of 5.8 Mg ha− 1 yr− 1. The use of spatially-distributed models is required to better quantify soil redistribution processes and to evaluate superficial soil distribution. However, point-estimates of soil redistribution such as those provided by 137Cs are required to allow calibration of the models. The knowledge about the spatial distribution of erosion processes is a useful tool for the application of effective soil erosion control and prevention strategies on water and tillage erosion on agroecosystems.
Article 0 Reads 9 Citations Bias in the variance of gridded data sets leads to misleading conclusions about changes in climate variability Santiago Beguería, Sergio M. Vicente‐Serrano, Miquel Tomás‐B... Published: 15 December 2015
International Journal of Climatology, doi: 10.1002/joc.4561
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Many studies addressing climate change and climate variability over large regions rely on gridded data. Grids are preferred to station-based data sets because they help avoiding bias arising from the irregular spatial distribution of the observations. However, while spatial interpolation techniques used for constructing gridded data are good at preserving the mean of the data, they do not offer an adequate representation of their variance. In fact, the grid's variance depends largely on the spatial density of observations used for constructing it. Most global and regional climate data sets are characterized by large temporal changes in the number of observations available for interpolation, with a strong reduction in the last 30 years. These changes in the sample size result in changes in the variance of gridded data that are merely an effect of the interpolation process, and ignoring this fact may lead to erroneous conclusions about changes in climate variability and extremes. We discuss this problem and we demonstrate its importance with a widely used global dataset of temperature and precipitation. We propose to move from interpolation techniques towards statistical simulation approaches that provide a better representation of climate variability when constructing climatic grids.
BOOK-CHAPTER 0 Reads 0 Citations The Ordesa and Monte Perdido National Park, Central Pyrenees José M. García-Ruiz, Blas L. Valero-Garces, Santiago Beguerí... Published: 01 January 2014
World Geomorphological Landscapes, doi: 10.1007/978-94-017-8628-7_14
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The Ordesa and Monte Perdido National Park was created in 1918 and enlarged in 1982 to highlight and protect spectacular high mountain relief dominated by limestone. Alpine tectonics resulted in the piling-up of south-verging thrust sheets leading to the thick sedimentary successions exposed in impressive vertical cliffs. The presence of massive limestones has favoured the development of deep canyons and karst landforms, including karren, dolines, and caves with large shafts. Quaternary glaciations contributed to increase the geomorphic diversity, forming cirques and stunning U-shaped valleys. Small glaciers from the Little Ice Age still remain on the north-facing slopes of the Monte Perdido. Periglacial processes in the most elevated areas of the National Park, as well as erosion in thick soils developed on marly limestone have produced unique geomorphological features.
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Modelización espacialmente distribuida de la erosión y el transporte de sedimento en cuencas de montaña del Pirineo arag... L.C. Alatorre, Santiago Beguería, Noemí Lana-Renault, Ana Na... Published: 08 July 2013
Cuadernos de Investigación Geográfica, doi: 10.18172/cig.1992
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Article 0 Reads 115 Citations Mediterranean water resources in a global change scenario José M. García-Ruiz, J. Ignacio López-Moreno, Sergio M. Vice... Published: 01 April 2011
Earth-Science Reviews, doi: 10.1016/j.earscirev.2011.01.006
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Mediterranean areas of both southern Europe and North Africa are subject to dramatic changes that will affect the sustainability, quantity, quality, and management of water resources. Most climate models forecast an increase in temperature and a decrease in precipitation at the end of the 21st century. This will enhance stress on natural forests and shrubs, and will result in more water consumption, evapotranspiration, and probably interception, which will affect the surface water balance and the partitioning of precipitation between evapotranspiration, runoff, and groundwater flow. As a consequence, soil water content will decline, saturation conditions will be increasingly rare and restricted to periods in winter and spring, and snow accumulation and melting will change, especially in the mid-mountain areas. Future land management will be characterized by forest and shrub expansion in most Mediterranean mountain areas, as a consequence of farmland and grazing abandonment, with increasing human pressure localized only in some places (ski resort and urbanized of valley floors). In the lowlands, particularly in the coastal fringe, increasing water demand will occur as a consequence of expansion of irrigated lands, as well as the growth of urban and industrial areas, and tourist resorts.
Article 0 Reads 12 Citations Influence of the North Atlantic Oscillation on water resources in central Iberia: Precipitation, streamflow anomalies, a... Juan I. López-Moreno, Santiago Beguería, Sergio M. Vicente-S... Published: 01 September 2007
Water Resources Research, doi: 10.1029/2007wr005864
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[1] This paper analyzes the influence of the extreme phases of the winter North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) on water resources in the Spanish region of the Tagus River basin. By analyzing a winter NAO index based on station sea level pressure, the years between 1957 and 2003 were classified as normal, positive, and negative NAO years. A statistical test was then applied to monthly data series of precipitation, river discharge, reservoir storage, and reservoir release to analyze the variations in these variables. For all four variables, significant differences were found between positive and negative NAO years, the former resulting in reduced water availability (negative anomalies) and the latter resulting in increased water availability (positive anomalies). The influence of extreme NAO winters was found to act with different time lags on different variables: The effect of extreme NAO winters on precipitation was found to be quite immediate (and significant for December to March), but this effect was observed later in the year and lasted longer for river discharge, reservoir storage, and water release. Positive and negative NAO years were also found to have different effects on these variables, in that the effects of positive years were more sustained and those of negative years were more rapid and less prolonged. In spite of the high variability of the availability of water resources, the strategies for management of the reservoir system of the basin were found in most cases to provide a regular supply that meets water demands. However, our results also indicate that these water management practices are not adequate for the expected scenarios of climate change and increasing water demand.