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Willem M. De Vos  - - - 
Top co-authors See all
Bas Teusink

139 shared publications

Systems Bioinformatics, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Douwe Molenaar

104 shared publications

Systems Bioinformatics, AIMMS, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Eddy J Smid

9 shared publications

Top Institute Food and Nutrition, formerly WCFS, Wageningen, The Netherlands

Michiel Wels

5 shared publications

TI Food and Nutrition, Wageningen, The Netherlands

L. Mariela Serrano

1 shared publications

Top Institute Food and Nutrition, formerly WCFS, Wageningen, The Netherlands

413
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Publication Record
Distribution of Articles published per year 
(2004 - 2019)
Total number of journals
published in
 
32
 
Publications See all
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Akkermansia muciniphila ameliorates the age-related decline in colonic mucus thickness and attenuates immune activation ... Benthe Van Der Lugt, Adriaan A. Van Beek, Steven Aalvink, Be... Published: 08 March 2019
Immunity & Ageing, doi: 10.1186/s12979-019-0145-z
DOI See at publisher website PubMed View at PubMed ABS Show/hide abstract
The use of Akkermansia muciniphila as potential therapeutic intervention is receiving increasing attention. Health benefits attributed to this bacterium include an improvement of metabolic disorders and exerting anti-inflammatory effects. The abundance of A. muciniphila is associated with a healthy gut in early mid- and later life. However, the effects of A. muciniphila on a decline in intestinal health during the aging process are not investigated yet. We supplemented accelerated aging Ercc1−/Δ7 mice with A. muciniphila for 10 weeks and investigated histological, transcriptional and immunological aspects of intestinal health. The thickness of the colonic mucus layer increased about 3-fold after long-term A. muciniphila supplementation and was even significantly thicker compared to mice supplemented with Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1. Colonic gene expression profiles pointed towards a decreased expression of genes and pathways related to inflammation and immune function, and suggested a decreased presence of B cells in colon. Total B cell frequencies in spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes were not altered after A. muciniphila supplementation. Mature and immature B cell frequencies in bone marrow were increased, whereas B cell precursors were unaffected. These findings implicate that B cell migration rather than production was affected by A. muciniphila supplementation. Gene expression profiles in ileum pointed toward a decrease in metabolic- and immune-related processes and antimicrobial peptide production after A. muciniphila supplementation. Besides, A. muciniphila decreased the frequency of activated CD80+CD273− B cells in Peyer’s patches. Additionally, the increased numbers of peritoneal resident macrophages and a decrease in Ly6Cint monocyte frequencies in spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes add evidence for the potentially anti-inflammatory properties of A. muciniphila. Altogether, we show that supplementation with A. muciniphila prevented the age-related decline in thickness of the colonic mucus layer and attenuated inflammation and immune-related processes at old age. This study implies that A. muciniphila supplementation can contribute to a promotion of healthy aging. The online version of this article (10.1186/s12979-019-0145-z) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Biotechnology of health-promoting bacteria François P. Douillard, Willem M. De Vos Published: 01 March 2019
Biotechnology Advances, doi: 10.1016/j.biotechadv.2019.03.008
DOI See at publisher website
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Metabolic improvement in obese patients after duodenal–jejunal exclusion is associated with intestinal microbiota compos... C. De Jonge, S. Fuentes, E. G. Zoetendal, N. D. Bouvy, R. Ne... Published: 14 February 2019
International Journal of Obesity, doi: 10.1038/s41366-019-0336-x
DOI See at publisher website
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Intestinal epithelial N-acylphosphatidylethanolamine phospholipase D links dietary fat to metabolic adaptations in obesi... Amandine Everard, Hubert Plovier, Marialetizia Rastelli, Mat... Published: 28 January 2019
Nature Communications, doi: 10.1038/s41467-018-08051-7
DOI See at publisher website PubMed View at PubMed ABS Show/hide abstract
Variations in N-acylethanolamines (NAE) levels are associated with obesity and metabolic comorbidities. Their role in the gut remains unclear. Therefore, we generated a mouse model of inducible intestinal epithelial cell (IEC)-specific deletion of N-acylphosphatidylethanolamine phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD), a key enzyme involved in NAE biosynthesis (Napepld∆IEC). We discovered that Napepld∆IEC mice are hyperphagic upon first high-fat diet (HFD) exposure, and develop exacerbated obesity and steatosis. These mice display hypothalamic Pomc neurons dysfunctions and alterations in intestinal and plasma NAE and 2-acylglycerols. After long-term HFD, Napepld∆IEC mice present reduced energy expenditure. The increased steatosis is associated with higher gut and liver lipid absorption. Napepld∆IEC mice display altered gut microbiota. Akkermansia muciniphila administration partly counteracts the IEC NAPE-PLD deletion effects. In conclusion, intestinal NAPE-PLD is a key sensor in nutritional adaptation to fat intake, gut-to-brain axis and energy homeostasis and thereby constitutes a novel target to tackle obesity and related disorders.
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations The Effect of Psyllium Husk on Intestinal Microbiota in Constipated Patients and Healthy Controls Jonna Jalanka, Giles Major, Kathryn Murray, Gulzar Singh, Ad... Published: 20 January 2019
International Journal of Molecular Sciences, doi: 10.3390/ijms20020433
DOI See at publisher website ABS Show/hide abstract
Psyllium is a widely used treatment for constipation. It traps water in the intestine increasing stool water, easing defaecation and altering the colonic environment. We aimed to assess the impact of psyllium on faecal microbiota, whose key role in gut physiology is being increasingly recognised. We performed two randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blinded trials comparing 7 days of psyllium with a placebo (maltodextrin) in 8 healthy volunteers and 16 constipated patients respectively. We measured the patients’ gastrointestnal (GI) transit, faecal water content, short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) and the stool microbiota composition. While psyllium supplement had a small but significant effect on the microbial composition of healthy adults (increasing Veillonella and decreasing Subdoligranulum), in constipated subjects there were greater effects on the microbial composition (increased Lachnospira, Faecalibacterium, Phascolarctobacterium, Veillonella and Sutterella and decreased uncultured Coriobacteria and Christensenella) and alterations in the levels of acetate and propionate. We found several taxa to be associated with altered GI transit, SCFAs and faecal water content in these patients. Significant increases in three genera known to produce butyrate, Lachnospira, Roseburia and Faecalibacterium, correlated with increased faecal water. In summary, psyllium supplementation increased stool water and this was associated with significant changes in microbiota, most marked in constipated patients.
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations The Effect of Psyllium Husk on Intestinal Microbiota in Constipated Patients and Healthy Controls. Jonna Jalanka, Giles Major, Kathryn Murray, Gulzar Singh, Ad... Published: 20 January 2019
International Journal of Molecular Sciences,
PubMed View at PubMed ABS Show/hide abstract
Psyllium is a widely used treatment for constipation. It traps water in the intestine increasing stool water, easing defaecation and altering the colonic environment. We aimed to assess the impact of psyllium on faecal microbiota, whose key role in gut physiology is being increasingly recognised. We performed two randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blinded trials comparing 7 days of psyllium with a placebo (maltodextrin) in 8 healthy volunteers and 16 constipated patients respectively. We measured the patients' gastrointestnal (GI) transit, faecal water content, short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) and the stool microbiota composition. While psyllium supplement had a small but significant effect on the microbial composition of healthy adults (increasing Veillonella and decreasing Subdoligranulum), in constipated subjects there were greater effects on the microbial composition (increased Lachnospira, Faecalibacterium, Phascolarctobacterium, Veillonella and Sutterella and decreased uncultured Coriobacteria and Christensenella) and alterations in the levels of acetate and propionate. We found several taxa to be associated with altered GI transit, SCFAs and faecal water content in these patients. Significant increases in three genera known to produce butyrate, Lachnospira, Roseburia and Faecalibacterium, correlated with increased faecal water. In summary, psyllium supplementation increased stool water and this was associated with significant changes in microbiota, most marked in constipated patients.
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