Please login first
Janet Richardson  - - - 
Top co-authors See all
Alexander Molassiotis

230 shared publications

School of Nursing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong SAR

Thomas Heidenreich

82 shared publications

Faculty of Social Work, Health Care, and Nursing Sciences, University of Applied Sciences Esslingen, Esslingen am Neckar, Germany

Sabine Pahl

51 shared publications

School of Psychology, Faculty of Health and Human Sciences, Plymouth University, Plymouth, UK

John Hughes

19 shared publications

Faculty of Medicine McGill University Montreal, QC Canada

Carmen Alvarez-Nieto

15 shared publications

Research Group Nursing and Innovation in Healthcare (CuiDsalud), Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universidad de Jaén, Building B3, office 243, Campus Las Lagunillas, 23071 Jaén

74
Publications
0
Reads
0
Downloads
282
Citations
Publication Record
Distribution of Articles published per year 
(1991 - 2018)
Total number of journals
published in
 
30
 
Publications See all
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations The Impact of Superfast Broadband, Tailored Booklets for Households, and Discussions With General Practitioners on Perso... Gunther Eysenbach, John Powell, Susan Perez, Philip Abbott-G... Published: 11 March 2019
Journal of Medical Internet Research, doi: 10.2196/11386
DOI See at publisher website PubMed View at PubMed ABS Show/hide abstract
Electronic health (eHealth) may improve health outcomes, but many people remain digitally excluded. Personal readiness to use the internet for health may be limited by lack of internet infrastructure, personal skills, social support, service provision, and cost. The impact of interventions to reduce these barriers is unknown. From 2011, the British Government supported the implementation of “superfast” broadband (Superfast) across the rural county of Cornwall. This provided the opportunity to assess the impact of interventions at regional, practice, and household levels. This study aimed to assess the impact of 3 interventions on personal eHealth readiness: (1) regional-level implementation of Superfast, (2) practice-level discussions with general practitioners to encourage greater internet use in health service provision, and (3) household-level tailored booklets providing information to help improve personal skills in eHealth. This was a cluster quasi-randomized factorial controlled trial. Implementation of Superfast was monitored, and postcodes were classified as having early or late availability. An algorithm selected 78 from 16,385 eligible postcodes to minimize the possibility of overlap between general practices and ensure a balance of urban and rural areas; 1388 households were randomly selected from the 78 postcodes and allocated to the 8 (2 × 2 × 2) study arms. A modified version of the Personal eHealth Readiness Questionnaire was used to compare scores (0 to 10) and 4 components (personal, provision, support, and economic) from baseline (August 2013) to the 18-month follow-up between the 8 arms, to assess the impact of interventions. We compared SDs of scores to assess changes in eHealth inequalities. eHealth readiness improved over 18 months from 4.36 out of 10 to 4.59 out of 10 (t235=4.18; P<.001; CI=0.13 to 0.35), resulting from increases in personal and provision components of the score (t255=3.191; P=.002 and t258=3.410; P=.001). However, there were no significant differences between the 3 interventions, either singly or in combination using intention-to-treat analysis. The proportion of internet users did not significantly increase (79.2%, 205/259 to 81.5%, 211/259) and mobile use was significantly greater (50.5%, 101/199 to 64.8%, 129/199). There was no change in eHealth inequality. People in Cornwall became more ready to adopt eHealth services, increasing both their personal ability to use eHealth and their methods of access. The implementation of Superfast may have contributed to this; we are certain that our other 2 interventions did not. This increased eHealth readiness did not cause a larger digital divide. The study illustrates the complexity of conducting a randomized controlled trial to assess the impact of interventions at regional, practice, and household levels. Our method may be of use to others. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00102401; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02355808 (Archived by WebCite at...
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations CHANGING ACCOUNTING UNDERGRADUATES' ATTITUDES TOWARDS SUSTAINABILITY AND CLIMATE CHANGE THROUGH USING A SUSTAINABILITY S... Rumbidzai Mukonoweshuro, Janet Richardson, Jane Grose, Tauri... Published: 01 December 2018
International Journal of Business Research, doi: 10.18374/ijbr-18-4.7
DOI See at publisher website
PREPRINT-CONTENT 0 Reads 0 Citations The Impact of Superfast Broadband, Tailored Booklets for Households, and Discussions With General Practitioners on Perso... Phillip Abbott-Garner, Janet Richardson, Ray B Jones Published: 26 June 2018
Journal of Medical Internet Research, doi: 10.2196/preprints.11386
DOI See at publisher website ABS Show/hide abstract
BACKGROUND Electronic health (eHealth) may improve health outcomes, but many people remain digitally excluded. Personal readiness to use the internet for health may be limited by lack of internet infrastructure, personal skills, social support, service provision, and cost. The impact of interventions to reduce these barriers is unknown. From 2011, the British Government supported the implementation of “superfast” broadband (Superfast) across the rural county of Cornwall. This provided the opportunity to assess the impact of interventions at regional, practice, and household levels. OBJECTIVE This study aimed to assess the impact of 3 interventions on personal eHealth readiness: (1) regional-level implementation of Superfast, (2) practice-level discussions with general practitioners to encourage greater internet use in health service provision, and (3) household-level tailored booklets providing information to help improve personal skills in eHealth. METHODS This was a cluster quasi-randomized factorial controlled trial. Implementation of Superfast was monitored, and postcodes were classified as having early or late availability. An algorithm selected 78 from 16,385 eligible postcodes to minimize the possibility of overlap between general practices and ensure a balance of urban and rural areas; 1388 households were randomly selected from the 78 postcodes and allocated to the 8 (2 × 2 × 2) study arms. A modified version of the Personal eHealth Readiness Questionnaire was used to compare scores (0 to 10) and 4 components (personal, provision, support, and economic) from baseline (August 2013) to the 18-month follow-up between the 8 arms, to assess the impact of interventions. We compared SDs of scores to assess changes in eHealth inequalities. RESULTS eHealth readiness improved over 18 months from 4.36 out of 10 to 4.59 out of 10 (t235=4.18; P<.001; CI=0.13 to 0.35), resulting from increases in personal and provision components of the score (t255=3.191; P=.002 and t258=3.410; P=.001). However, there were no significant differences between the 3 interventions, either singly or in combination using intention-to-treat analysis. The proportion of internet users did not significantly increase (79.2%, 205/259 to 81.5%, 211/259) and mobile use was significantly greater (50.5%, 101/199 to 64.8%, 129/199). There was no change in eHealth inequality. CONCLUSIONS People in Cornwall became more ready to adopt eHealth services, increasing both their personal ability to use eHealth and their methods of access. The implementation of Superfast may have contributed to this; we are certain that our other 2 interventions did not. This increased eHealth readiness did not cause a larger digital divide. The study illustrates the complexity of conducting a randomized controlled trial to assess the impact of interventions at regional, practice, and household levels. Our method may be of use to others. CLINICALTRIAL ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00102401;...
Article 6 Reads 2 Citations Developing digital educational materials for nursing and sustainability: The results of an observational study Carmen Álvarez-Nieto, Janet Richardson, Gema Parra-Anguita, ... Published: 01 January 2018
Nurse Education Today, doi: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.10.008
DOI See at publisher website PubMed View at PubMed
Article 4 Reads 1 Citation Developing awareness of sustainability in nursing and midwifery using a scenario-based approach: Evidence from a pre and... Janet Richardson, Jane Grose, Martyn Bradbury, Janet Kelsey Published: 01 July 2017
Nurse Education Today, doi: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.04.022
DOI See at publisher website PubMed View at PubMed
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations A comparison of waste compositions at health and social care facilities Sean Manzi, Andy Nichols, Janet Richardson Published: 02 September 2016
British Journal of Healthcare Management, doi: 10.12968/bjhc.2016.22.9.469
DOI See at publisher website
Top