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J. RICHARDSON  - - - 
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K. Takahashi

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A. Carbone

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S. Nilsson

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S. Watts

383 shared publications

S. Kitamura

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Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Developing awareness of sustainability in nursing and midwifery using a scenario-based approach: evidence from a pre and... Janet Richardson, Jane Grose, Martyn Bradbury, Janet Kelsey Published: 01 July 2017
Nurse Education Today, doi: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.04.022
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•Climate change and resources scarcity will impact on all nurses and all nations•Nurses will need to be equipped to manage waste to reduce environmental impacts•Scenario-based learning changes students' knowledge and attitudes to sustainability AbstractBackgroundThe delivery of healthcare has an impact on the environment and contributes to climate change. As a consequence, the way in which nurses and midwives use and dispose of natural resources in clinical practice, and the subsequent impact on the environment, should be integral component of nursing and midwifery education. Opportunities need to be found to embed such issues into nursing curricula; thus bringing sustainability issues ‘closer to home’ and making them more relevant for clinical practice.ObjectivesThe study was designed to measure the impact of a sustainability-focussed, scenario-based learning educational intervention on the attitudes and knowledge of student nurses and midwives.DesignPre test/Post test intervention study using scenario-based learning as the educational intervention. The Sustainability Attitudes in Nursing Survey (SANS_2) was used as the outcome measure.SettingsClinical skills session in a UK University School of Nursing and Midwifery.Participants676 s year undergraduate nursing and midwifery students.MethodsThe 7-point scale SANS survey was completed before and after the teaching session; standard non-parametric analysis compared pre and post intervention scores.ResultsChanges were observed in attitude towards climate change and sustainability and to the inclusion of these topics within the nursing curricula (p = 0.000). Participants demonstrated greater knowledge of natural resource use and the cost of waste disposal following the session (p = 0.000). Participants also reported that sessions were realistic, and levels of agreement with statements supporting the value of the session and the interactive nature of delivery were higher following the session.ConclusionsUsing a scenario-based learning approach with nursing and midwifery students can change attitudes and knowledge toward sustainability and climate change. Embedding this approach in the context of clinical skills provides a novel and engaging approach that is both educationally sound and clinically relevant. BackgroundThe delivery of healthcare has an impact on the environment and contributes to climate change. As a consequence, the way in which nurses and midwives use and dispose of natural resources in clinical practice, and the subsequent impact on the environment, should be integral component of nursing and midwifery education. Opportunities need to be found to embed such issues into nursing curricula; thus bringing sustainability issues ‘closer to home’ and making them more relevant for clinical practice. The delivery of healthcare has an impact on the environment and contributes to climate change. As a consequence, the way in which nurses and midwives use and dispose of natural resources in clinical practice, and the subsequent impact on the environment, should be integral component of nursing and midwifery education. Opportunities need to be found to embed such issues into nursing curricula; thus bringing sustainability issues ‘closer to home’ and making them more relevant for clinical practice. ObjectivesThe study was designed to measure the impact of a sustainability-focussed, scenario-based learning educational intervention on the attitudes and knowledge of student nurses and midwives. The study was designed to measure the impact of a sustainability-focussed, scenario-based learning educational intervention on the attitudes and knowledge of student nurses and midwives. DesignPre test/Post test intervention study using scenario-based learning as the educational intervention. The Sustainability Attitudes in Nursing Survey (SANS_2) was used as the outcome measure. Pre test/Post test intervention study using scenario-based learning as the educational intervention. The Sustainability Attitudes in Nursing Survey (SANS_2) was used as the outcome measure. SettingsClinical skills session in a UK University School of Nursing and Midwifery. Clinical skills session in a UK University School of Nursing and Midwifery. Participants676 s year undergraduate nursing and midwifery students. 676 s year undergraduate nursing and midwifery students. MethodsThe 7-point scale SANS survey was completed before and after the teaching session; standard non-parametric analysis compared pre and post intervention scores. The 7-point scale SANS survey was completed before and after the teaching session; standard non-parametric analysis compared pre and post intervention scores. ResultsChanges were observed in attitude towards climate change and sustainability and to the inclusion of these topics within the nursing curricula (p = 0.000). Participants demonstrated greater knowledge of natural resource use and the cost of waste disposal following the session (p = 0.000). Participants also reported that sessions were realistic, and levels of agreement with statements supporting the value of the session and the interactive nature of delivery were higher following the session. Changes were observed in attitude towards climate change and sustainability and to the inclusion of these topics within the nursing curricula (p = 0.000). Participants demonstrated greater knowledge of natural resource use and the cost of waste disposal following the session (p = 0.000). Participants also reported that sessions were realistic, and levels of agreement with statements supporting the value of the session and the interactive nature of delivery were higher following the session. ConclusionsUsing a scenario-based learning approach with nursing and midwifery students can change attitudes and knowledge toward sustainability and climate change. Embedding this approach in the context of clinical skills provides a novel and engaging approach that is both educationally sound and clinically relevant. Using a scenario-based learning approach with nursing and midwifery students can change attitudes and knowledge toward sustainability and climate change. Embedding this approach in the context of clinical skills provides a novel and engaging approach that is both educationally sound and clinically relevant.
Article 1 Read 0 Citations Cortical generation of on-going “Delta” and “Alpha” EEG rhythms in mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease and Alzheimer’s d... C. Babiloni, C. Del Percio, N. Marzano, S. Cordone, G. Noce,... Published: 01 March 2016
Clinical Neurophysiology, doi: 10.1016/j.clinph.2015.11.082
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Background and aimIn the framework of IMI PharmaCog project (Grant Agreement n°115009, www.pharmacog.org), this study evaluated whether cortical sources of resting state EEG rhythms were related to cerebrospinal fluid A®42 level in amnesic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subjects and have translational value in mouse model of AD.MethodsThe research data (including human biological samples) were sourced ethically and used in line with international ethical standards. EEG rhythms were recorded in 127 aMCI subjects. Cortical sources of global delta (2–4 Hz) and low-frequency alpha (8–10.5 Hz) EEG rhythms were estimated by LORETA package. Back translation was tested on on-going EEG rhythms in wild type and transgenic mouse models of AD developing accumulation of A®42 in the brain (i.e. PDAPP, TASTPM).Results and conclusions(1) delta (<4 Hz) and dominant alpha frequencies (8–10 Hz) of cortical EEG rhythms were abnormal in the aMCI group in relation to positivity to A®42 in the CSF and/or disease progression, respectively; (2) EEG rhythms in the above frequency ranges were abnormal in transgenic mice (i.e. PDAPP, TASTPM) when compared to wild type ones. Resting state EEG rhythms may reflect AD amyloidosis in aMCI subjects and may have a counterpart in transgenic mouse models of AD.
Article 0 Reads 7 Citations Including sustainability issues in nurse education: A comparative study of first year student nurses' attitudes in four ... Janet Richardson, Fabienne Fasseur, Jane Grose, Norma Huss, ... Published: 01 February 2016
Nurse Education Today, doi: 10.1016/j.nedt.2015.11.005
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•The paper draws attention to sustainability and climate change as a global challenge in nursing and healthcare.•The paper compares student nurses attitudes towards climate change and sustainability across four European Countries.•SANS_2 is a reliable instrument to assess nursing students’ sustainability awareness.•There are significant differences in sustainability awareness of students of different European countries. SummaryIntroductionEducation in sustainable development is a goal recognised by a large number of countries and a vital concept in healthcare. It is therefore important that nurse education incorporates elements of sustainable development into nursing education curricula. However, there is limited research on student nurses' attitudes towards sustainability and no comparison of attitudes towards sustainability and its inclusion in the nursing curriculum across Europe.AimThis project aims to assess student nurses' attitudes towards sustainability, its relevance to nursing and its inclusion in the nursing curricula.1.To assess base-line attitudes at the start of nursing and midwifery training;2.To compare sustainability awareness between students participating in training in a number of European universities.DesignA comparative survey design using the Sustainability Attitudes in Nursing Survey (SANS_2) questionnaire.SettingsNursing classes of Universities and Nursing Schools in four European countries were investigated using a questionnaire consisting of five sustainability-related items.Participants916 nursing students (UK: 450, Germany: 196, Spain: 124, Switzerland: 146).Data analysisStandard descriptive and inferential statistical methods were used to establish psychometric quality (Principal Components Analysis, Cronbach's alpha, Pearson correlations) and compare student nurses from the four countries.ResultsThe reliability of SANS_2 was good (Cronbach's alpha = .82) and the five items loaded on a single factor which explained 58% of variance. ANOVA of the SANS_2 total score showed significant differences between countries with German nursing students showing more sustainability awareness than students from the UK and Spain.ConclusionsSANS_2 is a reliable instrument to assess nursing students' sustainability awareness; there are significant differences in sustainability awareness of students of different European countries.Limitations of the study include non-random sampling, possible method effects and social desirability effects.Relevance to clinical practiceSustainability will become increasingly important in clinical practice; greater knowledge about the attitudes of nurses towards sustainability can support the development and testing of sustainability-focused teaching and learning materials.
Article 0 Reads 2 Citations Exploring attitudes and knowledge of climate change and sustainability in a dental practice: A feasibility study into re... J. Große, J. RICHARDSON, I. Mills, David Moles, M. Nasser Published: 01 February 2016
British Dental Journal, doi: 10.1038/sj.bdj.2016.136
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Objective To understand the attitudes and behaviour of staff in dental practice towards adopting a reduce, reuse, recycle approach to resource management.Design A qualitative interview study.Setting The site for the study was a mixed NHS/private dental practice in North Devon.Subjects All disciplines from one dental practice.Methods (1) A practice scoping exercise - provided context and identified an interview sample. (2) Qualitative interviews with practice staff - explored knowledge and attitudes about sustainability and identified opportunities and limitations for the sustainable management of resources.Results The main issue raised by staff was the amount of waste generated. There was a strong desire to implement changes, but deep concerns were expressed about the impact of challenging current guidance on infection control.Conclusions Primary care dentistry provides both surgical and non-surgical care to more than half the UK population. Therefore, lessons learned from general dental practice can encourage positive change. More research is needed across dental practice in order to generalise these findings.
Article 0 Reads 4 Citations Tweet if you want to be sustainable: a thematic analysis of a Twitter chat to discuss sustainability in nurse education Janet Richardson, Jane Grose, Pam Nelmes, Gema Parra, Manuel... Published: 29 January 2016
Journal of Advanced Nursing, doi: 10.1111/jan.12900
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AimTo explore the concept of sustainability in nursing using social media as a vehicle for discussion on the topic.BackgroundThere is a need for an increased awareness among nurses of the issues that are crucial for the healthcare sector to prepare for climate change and contribute to sustainable development. However, topics about sustainability and climate change are not a requirement of nursing curricula in Europe; social media provides an opportunity to raise issues and promote discussion.DesignA thematic analysis of a Twitter discussion.MethodsA Twitter discussion session hosted by @WeNurses took place on 24 March 2015 over 1 hour. Data were gathered via this online discussion hosted on Twitter, a social media platform. Following the discussion a thematic analysis of the posted Tweets was conducted.FindingsOne hundred and nineteen people posted nine hundred and ninety six Tweets, a reach of 3,306,368. Tweets broadly followed the questions posted by the team. Several threads related to the sustainable use of healthcare resources and the need to reduce waste was evident. A Word Cloud of the Tweets highlighted prominent words in the discussion: sustainability, nursing/nurses, curriculum, important, waste, practice, resources, student, plastic, health, gloves.ConclusionSocial media is an effective way of engaging nurses and students in a discussion on challenging issues. Sustainability appears to be important for nurses, with a particular emphasis on resource use and the importance of sustainability topics in nurse education.
Article 0 Reads 3 Citations What's in a bin: A case study of dental clinical waste composition and potential greenhouse gas emission savings J. RICHARDSON, J. Große, Sean Manzi, I. Mills, D. R. Moles, ... Published: 22 January 2016
British Dental Journal, doi: 10.1038/sj.bdj.2016.55
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Dental practices have a unique position as dental staff use a high number of dental materials and instruments on a daily basis. It is unclear how dentists' and dental care professionals' choices and behaviours around selecting and using materials impact on the amount of unnecessary waste production. Although there are a number of articles exploring the quality and quantity of waste in dental practices, there are no studies on organisational strategies to decrease unnecessary waste. There is no clear economic analysis of the impact on associated cost to dental practices which consequently can affect the access of dental care for disadvantaged groups.