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Nina Rønsted  - - - 
77
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Distribution of Articles published per year 
(1998 - 2018)
Total number of journals
published in
 
32
 
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Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Hundred Fifty Years of Herbarium Collections Provide a Reliable Resource of Volatile Terpenoid Profiles Showing Strong S... Isa Jafari Foutami, Trine Mariager, Riikka Rinnan, Christoph... Published: 18 December 2018
Frontiers in Plant Science, doi: 10.3389/fpls.2018.01877
DOI See at publisher website PubMed View at PubMed ABS Show/hide abstract
Herbarium samples are increasingly being recognized for their potential in answering a wide range of research questions. However, the suitability of herbarium samples for chemical analysis is largely unexplored as they are thought to be too degraded. The aim of this study was to explore terpenoid profiles across time and geographic space for four medicinal species of Salvia across the Mediterranean to assess the suitability of using herbarium specimens in chemical analyses. Herbarium samples of Salvia aethiopis, S. multicaulis, S. officinalis, and S. sclarea collected over 150 years across the Mediterranean were compared to modern samples using both targeted and untargeted gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of terpene profiles. There was no effect of collection year on chemical composition, although the total concentration of the 20 assessed standards and two individual standards significantly decreased over time. Instead, chemical profiles were defined by species, with strong species effects identified on both the targeted and untargeted chemical composition. Geographic variation was a factor in regulating the untargeted chemical compositions, suggesting some underlying environmental effects. However, there was no effect of sample altitude on either the targeted or untargeted chemical compositions. Chemical composition of four Salvia species are predominantly defined by species, and there was a substantially smaller effect of year of sampling. Given these results herbarium collections may well represent a considerably underused resource for chemical analyses that can benefit biodiversity and other studies.
Article 0 Reads 1 Citation A phylogenetic road map to antimalarial Artemisia species Jaume Pellicer, C. Haris Saslis-Lagoudakis, Esperança Carrió... Published: 01 October 2018
Journal of Ethnopharmacology, doi: 10.1016/j.jep.2018.06.030
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The discovery of the antimalarial agent artemisinin is considered one of the most significant success stories of ethnopharmacological research in recent times. The isolation of artemisinin was inspired by the use of Artemisia annua in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and was awarded a Nobel Prize in 2015. Antimalarial activity has since been demonstrated for a range of other Artemisia species, suggesting that the genus could provide alternative sources of antimalarial treatments. Given the stunning diversity of the genus (c. 500 species), a prioritisation of taxa to be investigated for their likely antimalarial properties is required. Here we use a phylogenetic approach to explore the potential for identifying species more likely to possess antimalarial properties. Ethnobotanical data from literature reports is recorded for 117 species. Subsequent phylogenetically informed analysis was used to identify lineages in which there is an overrepresentation of species used to treat malarial symptoms, and which could therefore be high priority for further investigation of antimalarial activity. We show that these lineages indeed include several species with documented antimalarial activity. To further inform our approach, we use LC-MS/MS analysis to explore artemisinin content in fifteen species from both highlighted and not highlighted lineages. We detected artemisinin in nine species, in eight of them for the first time, doubling the number of Artemisia taxa known to content this molecule. Our findings indicate that artemisinin may be widespread across the genus, providing an accessible local resource outside the distribution area of Artemisia annua.
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Rush hour at the Museum – Diversification patterns provide new clues for the success of figs ( Ficus L., Moraceae) Sam Bruun-Lund, Brecht Verstraete, Finn Kjellberg, Nina Røns... Published: 01 July 2018
Acta Oecologica, doi: 10.1016/j.actao.2017.11.001
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Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Untargeted metabolic profiling reveals geography as the strongest predictor of metabolic phenotypes of a cosmopolitan we... Natalie Iwanycki Ahlstrand, Nicoline Havskov Reghev, Bo Mark... Published: 22 June 2018
Ecology and Evolution, doi: 10.1002/ece3.4195
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Plants produce a multitude of metabolites that contribute to their fitness and survival and play a role in local adaptation to environmental conditions. The effects of environmental variation are particularly well studied within the genus Plantago; however, previous studies have largely focused on targeting specific metabolites. Studies exploring metabolome‐wide changes are lacking, and the effects of natural environmental variation and herbivory on the metabolomes of plants growing in situ remain unknown. An untargeted metabolomic approach using ultra‐high‐performance liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry, coupled with variation partitioning, general linear mixed modeling, and network analysis was used to detect differences in metabolic phenotypes of Plantago major in fifteen natural populations across Denmark. Geographic region, distance, habitat type, phenological stage, soil parameters, light levels, and leaf area were investigated for their relative contributions to explaining differences in foliar metabolomes. Herbivory effects were further investigated by comparing metabolomes from damaged and undamaged leaves from each plant. Geographic region explained the greatest number of significant metabolic differences. Soil pH had the second largest effect, followed by habitat and leaf area, while phenological stage had no effect. No evidence of the induction of metabolic features was found between leaves damaged by herbivores compared to undamaged leaves on the same plant. Differences in metabolic phenotypes explained by geographic factors are attributed to genotypic variation and/or unmeasured environmental factors that differ at the regional level in Denmark. A small number of specialized features in the metabolome may be involved in facilitating the success of a widespread species such as Plantago major into such wide range of environmental conditions, although overall resilience in the metabolome was found in response to environmental parameters tested. Untargeted metabolomic approaches have great potential to improve our understanding of how specialized plant metabolites respond to environmental change and assist in adaptation to local conditions.
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Untargeted metabolic profiling reveals geography as the strongest predictor of metabolic phenotypes of a cosmopolitan we... Natalie Iwanycki Ahlstrand, Nicoline Havskov Reghev, Bo Mark... Published: 22 June 2018
Ecology and Evolution,
PubMed View at PubMed ABS Show/hide abstract
Plants produce a multitude of metabolites that contribute to their fitness and survival and play a role in local adaptation to environmental conditions. The effects of environmental variation are particularly well studied within the genus Plantago; however, previous studies have largely focused on targeting specific metabolites. Studies exploring metabolome-wide changes are lacking, and the effects of natural environmental variation and herbivory on the metabolomes of plants growing in situ remain unknown. An untargeted metabolomic approach using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, coupled with variation partitioning, general linear mixed modeling, and network analysis was used to detect differences in metabolic phenotypes of Plantago major in fifteen natural populations across Denmark. Geographic region, distance, habitat type, phenological stage, soil parameters, light levels, and leaf area were investigated for their relative contributions to explaining differences in foliar metabolomes. Herbivory effects were further investigated by comparing metabolomes from damaged and undamaged leaves from each plant. Geographic region explained the greatest number of significant metabolic differences. Soil pH had the second largest effect, followed by habitat and leaf area, while phenological stage had no effect. No evidence of the induction of metabolic features was found between leaves damaged by herbivores compared to undamaged leaves on the same plant. Differences in metabolic phenotypes explained by geographic factors are attributed to genotypic variation and/or unmeasured environmental factors that differ at the regional level in Denmark. A small number of specialized features in the metabolome may be involved in facilitating the success of a widespread species such as Plantago major into such wide range of environmental conditions, although overall resilience in the metabolome was found in response to environmental parameters tested. Untargeted metabolomic approaches have great potential to improve our understanding of how specialized plant metabolites respond to environmental change and assist in adaptation to local conditions.
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Analyses of Aloe Polysaccharides Using Carbohydrate Microarray Profiling. Louise I. Ahl, Olwen M. Grace, Henriette L. Pedersen, Willia... Published: 12 June 2018
Journal of AOAC International, doi: 10.5740/jaoacint.18-0120
DOI See at publisher website PubMed View at PubMed
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