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Heidi-Jayne Hawkins   Dr.  Other 
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Heidi-Jayne Hawkins published an article in April 2018.
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REFERENCE-ENTRY 1 Read 0 Citations Metabolic Adaptations of the Non-Mycotrophic Proteaceae to Soils with Low Phosphorus Availability Hans Lambers, Peta L. Clode, Heidi-Jayne Hawkins, Etienne La... Published: 20 April 2018
Annual Plant Reviews, doi: 10.1002/9781119312994.apr0526
DOI See at publisher website
Article 1 Read 0 Citations A global assessment of Holistic Planned Grazing™ compared with season-long, continuous grazing: meta-analysis findings Heidi-Jayne Hawkins Published: 03 April 2017
African Journal of Range & Forage Science, doi: 10.2989/10220119.2017.1358213
DOI See at publisher website
Article 2 Reads 0 Citations Does Holistic Planned Grazing™ work on native rangelands? Heidi-Jayne Hawkins, Alan Short, Kevin P Kirkman Published: 03 April 2017
African Journal of Range & Forage Science, doi: 10.2989/10220119.2017.1367328
DOI See at publisher website
Article 4 Reads 7 Citations The impact of crop rotation on soil microbial diversity: A meta-analysis Zander Samuel Venter, Karin Jacobs, Heidi-Jayne Hawkins Published: 01 July 2016
Pedobiologia, doi: 10.1016/j.pedobi.2016.04.001
DOI See at publisher website
BOOK-CHAPTER 1 Read 4 Citations Metabolic Adaptations of the Non-Mycotrophic Proteaceae to Soils With Low Phosphorus Availability Peta L. Clode, Heidi-Jayne Hawkins, Etienne Laliberté, Rafae... Published: 14 April 2015
Annual Plant Reviews Volume 48, doi: 10.1002/9781118958841.ch11
DOI See at publisher website
Article 2 Reads 68 Citations The importance of nutritional regulation of plant water flux Michael D. Cramer, Heidi-Jayne Hawkins, G. Anthony Verboom Published: 16 May 2009
Oecologia, doi: 10.1007/s00442-009-1364-3
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Transpiration is generally considered a wasteful but unavoidable consequence of photosynthesis, occurring because water is lost when stomata open for CO2 uptake. Additionally, transpiration has been ascribed the functions of cooling leaves, driving root to shoot xylem transport and mass flow of nutrients through the soil to the rhizosphere. As a consequence of the link between nutrient mass flow and transpiration, nutrient availability, particularly that of NO3−, partially regulates plant water flux. Nutrient regulation of transpiration may function through the concerted regulation of: (1) root hydraulic conductance through control of aquaporins by NO3−, (2) shoot stomatal conductance (g s) through NO production, and (3) pH and phytohormone regulation of g s. These mechanisms result in biphasic responses of water flux to NO3− availability. The consequent trade-off between water and nutrient flux has important implications for understanding plant distributions, for production of water use-efficient crops and for understanding the consequences of global-change-linked CO2 suppression of transpiration for plant nutrient acquisition.